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Title: Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City

Abstract

Urban water and energy systems are crucial for sustainably meeting basic service demands in cities. Therefore, this paper proposes and applies a technology-independent “reference resource-to-service system” framework for concurrent evaluation of urban water and energy system interventions and their ‘nexus’ or ‘interlinkages’. In a concrete application, data that approximate New York City conditions are used to evaluate a limited set of interventions in the residential sector, spanning from low-flow toilet shifts to extensive green roof installations. Results indicate that interventions motivated primarily by water management goals can considerably reduce energy use and contribute to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Similarly, energy efficiency interventions can considerably reduce water use in addition to lowering emissions. However, interventions yielding the greatest reductions in energy use and emissions are not necessarily the most water conserving ones, and vice versa. Useful further research, expanding the present analysis should consider a broader set of resource interactions, towards a full climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) nexus approach. Overall, assessing the impacts, trade-offs and co-benefits from interventions in one urban resource system on others also holds promise as support for increased resource efficiency through integrated decision making.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [5]
  1. KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)
  2. KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)
  3. Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  5. KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); International Inst. of Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Swedish Research Council (SRC); Dept. of Environmental Protection (DEP); Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability (OLTPS)
OSTI Identifier:
1424980
Report Number(s):
BNL-114506-2017-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 2210-6707
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; 621-2014-4964; 942-2015-1304
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sustainable Cities and Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2210-6707
Publisher:
Elseiver
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter, Howells, Mark, Destouni, Georgia, Bhatt, Vatsal, Bazilian, Morgan, and Rogner, Hans-Holger. Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007.
Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter, Howells, Mark, Destouni, Georgia, Bhatt, Vatsal, Bazilian, Morgan, & Rogner, Hans-Holger. Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007.
Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter, Howells, Mark, Destouni, Georgia, Bhatt, Vatsal, Bazilian, Morgan, and Rogner, Hans-Holger. Mon . "Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1424980.
@article{osti_1424980,
title = {Connecting the resource nexus to basic urban service provision – with a focus on water-energy interactions in New York City},
author = {Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter and Howells, Mark and Destouni, Georgia and Bhatt, Vatsal and Bazilian, Morgan and Rogner, Hans-Holger},
abstractNote = {Urban water and energy systems are crucial for sustainably meeting basic service demands in cities. Therefore, this paper proposes and applies a technology-independent “reference resource-to-service system” framework for concurrent evaluation of urban water and energy system interventions and their ‘nexus’ or ‘interlinkages’. In a concrete application, data that approximate New York City conditions are used to evaluate a limited set of interventions in the residential sector, spanning from low-flow toilet shifts to extensive green roof installations. Results indicate that interventions motivated primarily by water management goals can considerably reduce energy use and contribute to mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Similarly, energy efficiency interventions can considerably reduce water use in addition to lowering emissions. However, interventions yielding the greatest reductions in energy use and emissions are not necessarily the most water conserving ones, and vice versa. Useful further research, expanding the present analysis should consider a broader set of resource interactions, towards a full climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) nexus approach. Overall, assessing the impacts, trade-offs and co-benefits from interventions in one urban resource system on others also holds promise as support for increased resource efficiency through integrated decision making.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scs.2017.02.007},
journal = {Sustainable Cities and Society},
number = C,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 2works
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