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Title: Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment Field Campaign Report

Abstract

The Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment (LAFE; pronounced “la-fey”) deployed several state-of-the-art scanning lidar and remote-sensing systems to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. These instruments augmented the ARM instrument suite and collected a data set for studying feedback processes between the land surface and the atmosphere. The novel synergy of remote-sensing systems was applied for simultaneous measurements of land surface fluxes and horizontal and vertical transport processes in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) (Wulfmeyer et al. 2018). The impact of spatial inhomogeneities of the soil-vegetation continuum on land-atmosphere (L-A) feedback was studied using the scanning capability of the instrumentation. The time period of the observations was August 2017, as large differences in surface fluxes between different fields and bare soil were expected, e.g., pastures versus fields where the wheat has already been harvested. The LAFE strategy involved sampling the surface fluxes over different types of surfaces, and thus the in situ energy balance closure (EBC) stations were placed in fields with different plant covers (e.g., soy bean plants, native grasses, etc.).

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. University of Hohenheim
  2. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
University of Hohenheim, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
OSTI Identifier:
1424219
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-18-007
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-ACO5-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Southern Great Plains, convective boundary layer, surface fluxes, land-atmosphere feedbacks, Raman lidar, Doppler lidar, atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, NOAA, NASA, solar eclipse

Citation Formats

Wolfmeyer, Volker, and Turner, David. Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Wolfmeyer, Volker, & Turner, David. Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment Field Campaign Report. United States.
Wolfmeyer, Volker, and Turner, David. Wed . "Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment Field Campaign Report". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1424219.
@article{osti_1424219,
title = {Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment Field Campaign Report},
author = {Wolfmeyer, Volker and Turner, David},
abstractNote = {The Land-Atmosphere Feedback Experiment (LAFE; pronounced “la-fey”) deployed several state-of-the-art scanning lidar and remote-sensing systems to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. These instruments augmented the ARM instrument suite and collected a data set for studying feedback processes between the land surface and the atmosphere. The novel synergy of remote-sensing systems was applied for simultaneous measurements of land surface fluxes and horizontal and vertical transport processes in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) (Wulfmeyer et al. 2018). The impact of spatial inhomogeneities of the soil-vegetation continuum on land-atmosphere (L-A) feedback was studied using the scanning capability of the instrumentation. The time period of the observations was August 2017, as large differences in surface fluxes between different fields and bare soil were expected, e.g., pastures versus fields where the wheat has already been harvested. The LAFE strategy involved sampling the surface fluxes over different types of surfaces, and thus the in situ energy balance closure (EBC) stations were placed in fields with different plant covers (e.g., soy bean plants, native grasses, etc.).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Program Document:
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