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Title: Estimating environmental co-benefits of U.S. low-carbon pathways using an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution

Abstract

There are many technological pathways that can lead to reduced carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions. However, these pathways can have substantially different impacts on other environmental endpoints, such as air quality and energy-related water demand. This study uses an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution of the U.S. energy system to compare environmental impacts of alternative low-carbon pathways. One set of pathways emphasizes nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (NUC/CCS), while another set emphasizes renewable energy (RE). These are compared with pathways in which all technologies are available. Air pollutant emissions, mortality costs attributable to particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), and energy-related water demands are evaluated for 50% and 80% CO 2 reduction targets in the U.S. in 2050. The RE low-carbon pathways require less water withdrawal and consumption than the NUC/CCS pathways because of the large cooling demands of nuclear power and CCS. However, the NUC/CCS low-carbon pathways produce greater health benefits, mainly because the NUC/CCS assumptions result in less primary PM2.5 emissions from residential wood combustion. Environmental co-benefits differ among states because of factors such as existing technology stock, resource availability, and environmental and energy policies. An important finding is that biomass inmore » the building sector can offset some of the health co-benefits of the low-carbon pathways even though it plays only a minor role in reducing CO 2 emissions.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1423409
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-132500
Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619; 453040180
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Energy; Journal Volume: 216; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ou, Yang, Shi, Wenjing, Smith, Steven J., Ledna, Catherine M., West, J. Jason, Nolte, Christopher G., and Loughlin, Daniel H. Estimating environmental co-benefits of U.S. low-carbon pathways using an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.02.122.
Ou, Yang, Shi, Wenjing, Smith, Steven J., Ledna, Catherine M., West, J. Jason, Nolte, Christopher G., & Loughlin, Daniel H. Estimating environmental co-benefits of U.S. low-carbon pathways using an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.02.122.
Ou, Yang, Shi, Wenjing, Smith, Steven J., Ledna, Catherine M., West, J. Jason, Nolte, Christopher G., and Loughlin, Daniel H. Sun . "Estimating environmental co-benefits of U.S. low-carbon pathways using an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.02.122.
@article{osti_1423409,
title = {Estimating environmental co-benefits of U.S. low-carbon pathways using an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution},
author = {Ou, Yang and Shi, Wenjing and Smith, Steven J. and Ledna, Catherine M. and West, J. Jason and Nolte, Christopher G. and Loughlin, Daniel H.},
abstractNote = {There are many technological pathways that can lead to reduced carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, these pathways can have substantially different impacts on other environmental endpoints, such as air quality and energy-related water demand. This study uses an integrated assessment model with state-level resolution of the U.S. energy system to compare environmental impacts of alternative low-carbon pathways. One set of pathways emphasizes nuclear energy and carbon capture and storage (NUC/CCS), while another set emphasizes renewable energy (RE). These are compared with pathways in which all technologies are available. Air pollutant emissions, mortality costs attributable to particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), and energy-related water demands are evaluated for 50% and 80% CO2 reduction targets in the U.S. in 2050. The RE low-carbon pathways require less water withdrawal and consumption than the NUC/CCS pathways because of the large cooling demands of nuclear power and CCS. However, the NUC/CCS low-carbon pathways produce greater health benefits, mainly because the NUC/CCS assumptions result in less primary PM2.5 emissions from residential wood combustion. Environmental co-benefits differ among states because of factors such as existing technology stock, resource availability, and environmental and energy policies. An important finding is that biomass in the building sector can offset some of the health co-benefits of the low-carbon pathways even though it plays only a minor role in reducing CO2 emissions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.02.122},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 216,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2018}
}