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Title: In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in bearing steels

Abstract

This work integrates in-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in high carbon bearing steels. The presence of a kinematically metastable retained austenite in bearing steels can significantly affect the macro-mechanical and micro-mechanical material response. Mechanical characterization of metastable austenite is a critical component in accurately capturing the micro-mechanical behavior under typical application loads. Traditional mechanical characterization techniques are unable to discretely quantify the micro-mechanical response of the austenite, and as a result, the computational predictions rely heavily on trial and error or qualitative descriptions of the austenite phase. In order to overcome this, in the present work, we use in-situ neutron diffraction of a uniaxial tension test of an A485 Grade 1 bearing steel specimen. The mechanical response determined from the neutron diffraction analysis was incorporated into a hybrid crystal plasticity finite element model that accounts for the martensite's crystal plasticity and the stress-assisted transformation from austenite to martensite in bearing steels. Here, the modeling response was used to estimate the single crystal elastic constants of the austenite and martensite phases. Finally, the results show that using in-situ neutron diffraction, coupled with a crystal plasticity model, can successfully predictmore » both the micro-mechanical and macro-mechanical responses of bearing steels while accounting for the martensitic transformation of the retained austenite.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Timken Company, North Canton, OH (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Chemical and Engineering Materials Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1423079
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Materials Science and Engineering. A, Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructure and Processing
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 711; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0921-5093
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Transformation induced plasticity; Steel; Crystal plasticity; In-situ neutron diffraction; Kinematic stability

Citation Formats

Voothaluru, Rohit, Bedekar, Vikram, Xie, Qingge, Stoica, Alexandru D., Hyde, R. Scott, and An, Ke. In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in bearing steels. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2017.11.069.
Voothaluru, Rohit, Bedekar, Vikram, Xie, Qingge, Stoica, Alexandru D., Hyde, R. Scott, & An, Ke. In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in bearing steels. United States. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2017.11.069.
Voothaluru, Rohit, Bedekar, Vikram, Xie, Qingge, Stoica, Alexandru D., Hyde, R. Scott, and An, Ke. Wed . "In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in bearing steels". United States. doi:10.1016/j.msea.2017.11.069.
@article{osti_1423079,
title = {In-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in bearing steels},
author = {Voothaluru, Rohit and Bedekar, Vikram and Xie, Qingge and Stoica, Alexandru D. and Hyde, R. Scott and An, Ke},
abstractNote = {This work integrates in-situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling to study the kinematic stability of retained austenite in high carbon bearing steels. The presence of a kinematically metastable retained austenite in bearing steels can significantly affect the macro-mechanical and micro-mechanical material response. Mechanical characterization of metastable austenite is a critical component in accurately capturing the micro-mechanical behavior under typical application loads. Traditional mechanical characterization techniques are unable to discretely quantify the micro-mechanical response of the austenite, and as a result, the computational predictions rely heavily on trial and error or qualitative descriptions of the austenite phase. In order to overcome this, in the present work, we use in-situ neutron diffraction of a uniaxial tension test of an A485 Grade 1 bearing steel specimen. The mechanical response determined from the neutron diffraction analysis was incorporated into a hybrid crystal plasticity finite element model that accounts for the martensite's crystal plasticity and the stress-assisted transformation from austenite to martensite in bearing steels. Here, the modeling response was used to estimate the single crystal elastic constants of the austenite and martensite phases. Finally, the results show that using in-situ neutron diffraction, coupled with a crystal plasticity model, can successfully predict both the micro-mechanical and macro-mechanical responses of bearing steels while accounting for the martensitic transformation of the retained austenite.},
doi = {10.1016/j.msea.2017.11.069},
journal = {Materials Science and Engineering. A, Structural Materials: Properties, Microstructure and Processing},
number = C,
volume = 711,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Nov 21 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
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