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Title: Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices

Abstract

The Power Take-off (PTO) System for Marine Renewable Devices (Project) envisioned the design, manufacture and testing of a generator that would ultimately be suitable for fully flooded seawater operation. This would require a generator design and bearing system capable of operating in the presence of seawater without corrosion. The original generator concept design focused on a switched reluctance electromagnetic design for the generator with the understanding that the switched reluctance design would be more robust and tolerant of a seawater medium. A trade study was conducted to prove that hypothesis, but the results of the study indicated that there was no benefit to adopting a switched reluctance design over a more conventional synchronous permanent magnet design. In addition, the novelty of the switched reluctance design added more technical risk to the Project than was warranted. ORPC’s cost of energy analyses pointed to reliability as being the most critical factor for achieving Project systems performance advancement (SPA) metrics. Consequently, the choice of a permanent magnet (PM) machine design over a potentially less reliable switched reluctance design was necessary to achieve the Project results. As a result, ORPC determined that a PM design was a more appropriate design to achieve the Projectmore » goals and ORPC selected a highly qualified PM generator firm for the design, manufacture and factory testing of the generator. The factory acceptance test (FAT) of the generator took place on March 20-22, 2017 and all tests were successfully passed. Developing a design for a driveline as part of the PTO system required a full understanding of the loads and operating conditions expected. Detailed analyses for developing turbine loads and subsequent definition of bearing specifications were performed using various analytical methods. Two candidate bearing designs were proposed as part of the Project. After initial design work had been completed, ORPC designed a representative full-scale driveline to validate the detailed design of the advanced driveline components. Full-scale components were manufactured, instrumented and tested, simulating actual system parameters. This full-scale bearing test was conducted at the University of Maine Advanced Structures and Composites Laboratory. The purpose of this test was to characterize the frictional losses associated with bearings and test the suitability and functionality of some commercially available shaft couplings and expansion bushings in cross-flow turbine drivelines. In parallel with component testing and dynamometer testing of the PTO system, ORPC performed design work to demonstrate how the advanced PTO system will be integrated with all ORPC turbine generator units (TGUs). The work would focus primarily on the TidGen® TGU and assess how the advanced PTO would be integrated into TidGen® 001 or other units, then field-deployed and tested in an open water environment under actual operational conditions. In addition to the benefits provided to the MHK industry in general, and ORPC in particular, the Project provided benefits to the general public, including the following: • Increased general awareness of the potential for generation of electricity from ocean energy resources • Demonstrated continuing advancements in the commercialization of MHK technologies, making them more likely to contribute to the electricity generation supply in America in the coming years • Continued awareness of the local economic benefits from the MHK industry through job creation and local spending • Confirmation of a path to improvements in availability, power-to-weight ratio (PWR) and reduction in levelized cost of energy (LCOE). All Project tasks were completed, and the Project objectives were accomplished. All project milestones and deliverables were met. The designs, methodologies, practices, testing, data, analysis and lessons learned from the Project are a step forward in the development of the U.S. MHK industry and provide a sound basis for ultimate commercialization of ORPC’s power systems. Based on the what was learned and demonstrated during the Project, ORPC has determined that the ORPC power systems have the potential of accelerating the commercialization of tidal and ocean current MHK power systems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, Portland, ME (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, Portland, ME (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1423056
Report Number(s):
DOE-ORPC-FR018
DOE Contract Number:  
EE0006398
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Muljadi, E., Gevorgian, V., Wright, A., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J. (2016). Electrical Power Conversion of River and Tidal Power Generator. https://doi.org/10.1109/NAPS.2016.7747916Muljadi, E., Gevorgian, V., Wright, A., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J. (2016). Electrical Power Conversion of a River and Tidal Power Generator: Preprint. https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/66866.pdfMuljadi, E., Wright, A., Gevorgian, V., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J. (2016). Dynamic Braking System of a Tidal Generator: Preprint. https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/66396.pdfMuljadi, E., Wright, A., Gevorgian, V., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J. (2016). Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators, https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/66097.pdfMuljadi, E., Wright, A., Gevorgian, V., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J., (2016). Turbine Control of a Tidal and River Power Generator. https://doi.org/10.1109/NAPS.2016.7747912Muljadi, E., Gevorgian, V., Wright, A., Donegan, J., Marnagh, C., & McEntee, J. (2016). Turbine Control of a Tidal and River Power Generator: Preprint. https://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy16osti/66867.pdf
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; power take-off

Citation Formats

McEntee, Jarlath, Marnagh, Cian, Huckaby, Jason, and Wilson, Matthew. Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1423056.
McEntee, Jarlath, Marnagh, Cian, Huckaby, Jason, & Wilson, Matthew. Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices. United States. doi:10.2172/1423056.
McEntee, Jarlath, Marnagh, Cian, Huckaby, Jason, and Wilson, Matthew. Wed . "Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices". United States. doi:10.2172/1423056. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1423056.
@article{osti_1423056,
title = {Power Take-off System for Marine Renewable Devices},
author = {McEntee, Jarlath and Marnagh, Cian and Huckaby, Jason and Wilson, Matthew},
abstractNote = {The Power Take-off (PTO) System for Marine Renewable Devices (Project) envisioned the design, manufacture and testing of a generator that would ultimately be suitable for fully flooded seawater operation. This would require a generator design and bearing system capable of operating in the presence of seawater without corrosion. The original generator concept design focused on a switched reluctance electromagnetic design for the generator with the understanding that the switched reluctance design would be more robust and tolerant of a seawater medium. A trade study was conducted to prove that hypothesis, but the results of the study indicated that there was no benefit to adopting a switched reluctance design over a more conventional synchronous permanent magnet design. In addition, the novelty of the switched reluctance design added more technical risk to the Project than was warranted. ORPC’s cost of energy analyses pointed to reliability as being the most critical factor for achieving Project systems performance advancement (SPA) metrics. Consequently, the choice of a permanent magnet (PM) machine design over a potentially less reliable switched reluctance design was necessary to achieve the Project results. As a result, ORPC determined that a PM design was a more appropriate design to achieve the Project goals and ORPC selected a highly qualified PM generator firm for the design, manufacture and factory testing of the generator. The factory acceptance test (FAT) of the generator took place on March 20-22, 2017 and all tests were successfully passed. Developing a design for a driveline as part of the PTO system required a full understanding of the loads and operating conditions expected. Detailed analyses for developing turbine loads and subsequent definition of bearing specifications were performed using various analytical methods. Two candidate bearing designs were proposed as part of the Project. After initial design work had been completed, ORPC designed a representative full-scale driveline to validate the detailed design of the advanced driveline components. Full-scale components were manufactured, instrumented and tested, simulating actual system parameters. This full-scale bearing test was conducted at the University of Maine Advanced Structures and Composites Laboratory. The purpose of this test was to characterize the frictional losses associated with bearings and test the suitability and functionality of some commercially available shaft couplings and expansion bushings in cross-flow turbine drivelines. In parallel with component testing and dynamometer testing of the PTO system, ORPC performed design work to demonstrate how the advanced PTO system will be integrated with all ORPC turbine generator units (TGUs). The work would focus primarily on the TidGen® TGU and assess how the advanced PTO would be integrated into TidGen® 001 or other units, then field-deployed and tested in an open water environment under actual operational conditions. In addition to the benefits provided to the MHK industry in general, and ORPC in particular, the Project provided benefits to the general public, including the following: • Increased general awareness of the potential for generation of electricity from ocean energy resources • Demonstrated continuing advancements in the commercialization of MHK technologies, making them more likely to contribute to the electricity generation supply in America in the coming years • Continued awareness of the local economic benefits from the MHK industry through job creation and local spending • Confirmation of a path to improvements in availability, power-to-weight ratio (PWR) and reduction in levelized cost of energy (LCOE). All Project tasks were completed, and the Project objectives were accomplished. All project milestones and deliverables were met. The designs, methodologies, practices, testing, data, analysis and lessons learned from the Project are a step forward in the development of the U.S. MHK industry and provide a sound basis for ultimate commercialization of ORPC’s power systems. Based on the what was learned and demonstrated during the Project, ORPC has determined that the ORPC power systems have the potential of accelerating the commercialization of tidal and ocean current MHK power systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1423056},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}