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Title: Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure

Abstract

With advances in porous carbon synthesis techniques, hierarchically porous carbon (HPC) materials are being utilized as relatively new porous carbon sorbents for CO2 capture applications. These HPC materials were used as a platform to prepare samples with differing textural properties and morphologies to elucidate structure-property relationships. It was found that high microporous content, rather than overall surface area was of primary importance for predicting good CO2 capture performance. Two HPC materials were analyzed, each with near identical high surface area (~2700 m2/g) and colossally high pore volume (~10 cm3/g), but with different microporous content and pore size distributions, which led to dramatically different CO2 capture performance. Overall, large pore volumes obtained from distinct mesopores were found to significantly impact adsorption performance. From these results, an optimized HPC material was synthesized that achieved a high CO2 capacity of ~3.7 mmol/g at 25°C and 1 bar.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, United States
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1422275
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-129228
Journal ID: ISSN 0888-5885
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
CO2 absorption; hierarchical porous carbon; Carbon Capture

Citation Formats

Estevez, Luis, Barpaga, Dushyant, Zheng, Jian, Sabale, Sandip, Patel, Rajankumar L., Zhang, Ji-Guang, McGrail, B. Peter, and Motkuri, Radha Kishan. Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.7b03879.
Estevez, Luis, Barpaga, Dushyant, Zheng, Jian, Sabale, Sandip, Patel, Rajankumar L., Zhang, Ji-Guang, McGrail, B. Peter, & Motkuri, Radha Kishan. Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.7b03879.
Estevez, Luis, Barpaga, Dushyant, Zheng, Jian, Sabale, Sandip, Patel, Rajankumar L., Zhang, Ji-Guang, McGrail, B. Peter, and Motkuri, Radha Kishan. Wed . "Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.7b03879.
@article{osti_1422275,
title = {Hierarchically Porous Carbon Materials for CO 2 Capture: The Role of Pore Structure},
author = {Estevez, Luis and Barpaga, Dushyant and Zheng, Jian and Sabale, Sandip and Patel, Rajankumar L. and Zhang, Ji-Guang and McGrail, B. Peter and Motkuri, Radha Kishan},
abstractNote = {With advances in porous carbon synthesis techniques, hierarchically porous carbon (HPC) materials are being utilized as relatively new porous carbon sorbents for CO2 capture applications. These HPC materials were used as a platform to prepare samples with differing textural properties and morphologies to elucidate structure-property relationships. It was found that high microporous content, rather than overall surface area was of primary importance for predicting good CO2 capture performance. Two HPC materials were analyzed, each with near identical high surface area (~2700 m2/g) and colossally high pore volume (~10 cm3/g), but with different microporous content and pore size distributions, which led to dramatically different CO2 capture performance. Overall, large pore volumes obtained from distinct mesopores were found to significantly impact adsorption performance. From these results, an optimized HPC material was synthesized that achieved a high CO2 capacity of ~3.7 mmol/g at 25°C and 1 bar.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.iecr.7b03879},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
number = 4,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}