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Title: 2025 California Demand Response Potential Study - Charting California’s Demand Response Future. Final Report on Phase 2 Results

Abstract

California’s legislative and regulatory goals for renewable energy are changing the power grid’s dynamics. Increased variable generation resource penetration connected to the bulk power system, as well as, distributed energy resources (DERs) connected to the distribution system affect the grid’s reliable operation over many different time scales (e.g., days to hours to minutes to seconds). As the state continues this transition, it will require careful planning to ensure resources with the right characteristics are available to meet changing grid management needs. Demand response (DR) has the potential to provide important resources for keeping the electricity grid stable and efficient, to defer upgrades to generation, transmission and distribution systems, and to deliver customer economic benefits. This study estimates the potential size and cost of future DR resources for California’s three investor-owned utilities (IOUs): Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Edison Company (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E). Our goal is to provide data-driven insights as the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) evaluates how to enhance DR’s role in meeting California’s resource planning needs and operational requirements. We address two fundamental questions: 1. What cost-competitive DR service types will meet California’s future grid needs as it movesmore » towards clean energy and advanced infrastructure? 2. What is the size and cost of the expected resource base for the DR service types?« less

Authors:
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  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc. (E3), San Francisco, CA (United States)
  3. Nexant, Inc., Nashville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B); California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). California Institute for Energy and Environment
OSTI Identifier:
1421800
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Alstone, Peter, Potter, Jennifer, Piette, Mary Ann, Schwartz, Peter, Berger, Michael A., Dunn, Laurel N., Smith, Sarah J., Sohn, Michael D., Aghajanzadeh, Aruab, Stensson, Sofia, Szinai, Julie, Walter, Travis, McKenzie, Lucy, Lavin, Luke, Schneiderman, Brendan, Mileva, Ana, Cutter, Eric, Olson, Arne, Bode, Josh, Ciccone, Adriana, and Jain, Ankit. 2025 California Demand Response Potential Study - Charting California’s Demand Response Future. Final Report on Phase 2 Results. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1421800.
Alstone, Peter, Potter, Jennifer, Piette, Mary Ann, Schwartz, Peter, Berger, Michael A., Dunn, Laurel N., Smith, Sarah J., Sohn, Michael D., Aghajanzadeh, Aruab, Stensson, Sofia, Szinai, Julie, Walter, Travis, McKenzie, Lucy, Lavin, Luke, Schneiderman, Brendan, Mileva, Ana, Cutter, Eric, Olson, Arne, Bode, Josh, Ciccone, Adriana, & Jain, Ankit. 2025 California Demand Response Potential Study - Charting California’s Demand Response Future. Final Report on Phase 2 Results. United States. doi:10.2172/1421800.
Alstone, Peter, Potter, Jennifer, Piette, Mary Ann, Schwartz, Peter, Berger, Michael A., Dunn, Laurel N., Smith, Sarah J., Sohn, Michael D., Aghajanzadeh, Aruab, Stensson, Sofia, Szinai, Julie, Walter, Travis, McKenzie, Lucy, Lavin, Luke, Schneiderman, Brendan, Mileva, Ana, Cutter, Eric, Olson, Arne, Bode, Josh, Ciccone, Adriana, and Jain, Ankit. Wed . "2025 California Demand Response Potential Study - Charting California’s Demand Response Future. Final Report on Phase 2 Results". United States. doi:10.2172/1421800. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421800.
@article{osti_1421800,
title = {2025 California Demand Response Potential Study - Charting California’s Demand Response Future. Final Report on Phase 2 Results},
author = {Alstone, Peter and Potter, Jennifer and Piette, Mary Ann and Schwartz, Peter and Berger, Michael A. and Dunn, Laurel N. and Smith, Sarah J. and Sohn, Michael D. and Aghajanzadeh, Aruab and Stensson, Sofia and Szinai, Julie and Walter, Travis and McKenzie, Lucy and Lavin, Luke and Schneiderman, Brendan and Mileva, Ana and Cutter, Eric and Olson, Arne and Bode, Josh and Ciccone, Adriana and Jain, Ankit},
abstractNote = {California’s legislative and regulatory goals for renewable energy are changing the power grid’s dynamics. Increased variable generation resource penetration connected to the bulk power system, as well as, distributed energy resources (DERs) connected to the distribution system affect the grid’s reliable operation over many different time scales (e.g., days to hours to minutes to seconds). As the state continues this transition, it will require careful planning to ensure resources with the right characteristics are available to meet changing grid management needs. Demand response (DR) has the potential to provide important resources for keeping the electricity grid stable and efficient, to defer upgrades to generation, transmission and distribution systems, and to deliver customer economic benefits. This study estimates the potential size and cost of future DR resources for California’s three investor-owned utilities (IOUs): Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Edison Company (SCE), and San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E). Our goal is to provide data-driven insights as the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) evaluates how to enhance DR’s role in meeting California’s resource planning needs and operational requirements. We address two fundamental questions: 1. What cost-competitive DR service types will meet California’s future grid needs as it moves towards clean energy and advanced infrastructure? 2. What is the size and cost of the expected resource base for the DR service types?},
doi = {10.2172/1421800},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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