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Title: Backscatter particle image velocimetry via optical time-of-flight sectioning

Abstract

Conventional particle image velocimetry (PIV) configurations require a minimum of two optical access ports, inherently restricting the technique to a limited class of flows. Here, the development and application of a novel method of backscattered time-gated PIV requiring a single-optical-access port is described along with preliminary results. The light backscattered from a seeded flow is imaged over a narrow optical depth selected by an optical Kerr effect (OKE) time gate. The picosecond duration of the OKE time gate essentially replicates the width of the laser sheet of conventional PIV by limiting detected photons to a narrow time-of-flight within the flow. Thus, scattering noise from outside the measurement volume is eliminated. In conclusion, this PIV via the optical time-of-flight sectioning technique can be useful in systems with limited optical access and in flows near walls or other scattering surfaces.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1421653
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1416475
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-13527J
Journal ID: ISSN 0146-9592; OPLEDP; 659520
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Optics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0146-9592
Publisher:
Optical Society of America (OSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; Flow diagnostics; Velocimetry; Kerr effect; Backscattering

Citation Formats

Paciaroni, Megan E., Chen, Yi, Lynch, Kyle Patrick, and Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert. Backscatter particle image velocimetry via optical time-of-flight sectioning. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1364/OL.43.000312.
Paciaroni, Megan E., Chen, Yi, Lynch, Kyle Patrick, & Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert. Backscatter particle image velocimetry via optical time-of-flight sectioning. United States. doi:10.1364/OL.43.000312.
Paciaroni, Megan E., Chen, Yi, Lynch, Kyle Patrick, and Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert. Thu . "Backscatter particle image velocimetry via optical time-of-flight sectioning". United States. doi:10.1364/OL.43.000312. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421653.
@article{osti_1421653,
title = {Backscatter particle image velocimetry via optical time-of-flight sectioning},
author = {Paciaroni, Megan E. and Chen, Yi and Lynch, Kyle Patrick and Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert},
abstractNote = {Conventional particle image velocimetry (PIV) configurations require a minimum of two optical access ports, inherently restricting the technique to a limited class of flows. Here, the development and application of a novel method of backscattered time-gated PIV requiring a single-optical-access port is described along with preliminary results. The light backscattered from a seeded flow is imaged over a narrow optical depth selected by an optical Kerr effect (OKE) time gate. The picosecond duration of the OKE time gate essentially replicates the width of the laser sheet of conventional PIV by limiting detected photons to a narrow time-of-flight within the flow. Thus, scattering noise from outside the measurement volume is eliminated. In conclusion, this PIV via the optical time-of-flight sectioning technique can be useful in systems with limited optical access and in flows near walls or other scattering surfaces.},
doi = {10.1364/OL.43.000312},
journal = {Optics Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Thu Jan 11 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
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