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Title: Industrial knowledge design: an approach for designing information artifacts

Abstract

In this study, the authors define a new approach that addresses the challenge of efficiently designing informational artefacts for optimal knowledge acquisition, an important issue in cognitive ergonomics. Termed Industrial Knowledge Design (or InK'D), it draws from information-related (e.g. informatics) and neurosciences-related (e.g. neuroergonomics) disciplines. Although it can be used for a broad scope of communication-driven business functions, our focus as learning professionals is on conveying knowledge for purposes of training, education, and performance support. This paper discusses preliminary principles of InK'D practice that can be employed to maximise the quality and quantity of transferred knowledge through interaction design. The paper codifies tacit knowledge into explicit concepts that can be leveraged by expert and non-expert knowledge designers alike.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Office of the Secretary of Defense, Alexandria, VA (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1421643
Report Number(s):
SAND-2018-0692J
Journal ID: ISSN 1463-922X; 660127
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1463-922X
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION; information; knowledge; cognitive; design

Citation Formats

Schatz, Sae, Berking, Peter, and Raybourn, Elaine M. Industrial knowledge design: an approach for designing information artifacts. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/1463922X.2016.1239778.
Schatz, Sae, Berking, Peter, & Raybourn, Elaine M. Industrial knowledge design: an approach for designing information artifacts. United States. doi:10.1080/1463922X.2016.1239778.
Schatz, Sae, Berking, Peter, and Raybourn, Elaine M. Thu . "Industrial knowledge design: an approach for designing information artifacts". United States. doi:10.1080/1463922X.2016.1239778. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421643.
@article{osti_1421643,
title = {Industrial knowledge design: an approach for designing information artifacts},
author = {Schatz, Sae and Berking, Peter and Raybourn, Elaine M.},
abstractNote = {In this study, the authors define a new approach that addresses the challenge of efficiently designing informational artefacts for optimal knowledge acquisition, an important issue in cognitive ergonomics. Termed Industrial Knowledge Design (or InK'D), it draws from information-related (e.g. informatics) and neurosciences-related (e.g. neuroergonomics) disciplines. Although it can be used for a broad scope of communication-driven business functions, our focus as learning professionals is on conveying knowledge for purposes of training, education, and performance support. This paper discusses preliminary principles of InK'D practice that can be employed to maximise the quality and quantity of transferred knowledge through interaction design. The paper codifies tacit knowledge into explicit concepts that can be leveraged by expert and non-expert knowledge designers alike.},
doi = {10.1080/1463922X.2016.1239778},
journal = {Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science},
number = 6,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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