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Title: Strongly correlated electrons: Ground states, excited states, and transport. Final report

Abstract

The research supported by this grant focused on the quantum mechanical theory of the electrons in materials and molecules. Progress was made in dealing with electronic correlation effects in the ground state energy of molecular systems, and with topological concepts to classify the electronic state of molecules and materials, including excitation and transport properties. The physical and chemical properties of molecules and materials derive from their electronic structure, but the latter cannot be calculated exactly even with the most powerful computers because the computational cost of solving the exact equations of quantum mechanics increases exponentially with the number of electrons. The exponential cost originates from the correlations among the electrons that repel each other via Coulombic forces. In this project we have developed a new functional approximation for the ground state electronic energy that includes explicitly, and in a controllable way, the effects of the interelectronic correlations. In addition we have further developed topological concepts for classifying the electronic states of periodic ring molecules and solids. Topological concepts are very powerful because they allow us to predict subtle properties of materials and molecules using very general geometrical properties of the electron wavefunctions that do not depend on the quantitative detailsmore » of the electronic interactions, which are very difficult to calculate with high accuracy. The development of a new class of controlled functional approximations for the ground state energy of molecules and materials was the main goal of the project. It has been fulfilled with the formulation of the occupation-probabilities natural orbital functional theory (OP-NOFT). This approach introduces new theoretical concepts but practical application has proved to be harder than anticipated. So far it has been utilized only at its lowest level of approximation in the context of relatively small molecules (with up to 16 atoms). The study of topological properties of the electron wavefunctions in materials was not proposed in the original proposal but was prompted during the funding period by our interaction with leading experimental groups in materials chemistry and physics at Princeton University.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1421605
Report Number(s):
DOE-Princeton-ER-46201
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-05ER46201
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Car, Roberto. Strongly correlated electrons: Ground states, excited states, and transport. Final report. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1421605.
Car, Roberto. Strongly correlated electrons: Ground states, excited states, and transport. Final report. United States. doi:10.2172/1421605.
Car, Roberto. Thu . "Strongly correlated electrons: Ground states, excited states, and transport. Final report". United States. doi:10.2172/1421605. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421605.
@article{osti_1421605,
title = {Strongly correlated electrons: Ground states, excited states, and transport. Final report},
author = {Car, Roberto},
abstractNote = {The research supported by this grant focused on the quantum mechanical theory of the electrons in materials and molecules. Progress was made in dealing with electronic correlation effects in the ground state energy of molecular systems, and with topological concepts to classify the electronic state of molecules and materials, including excitation and transport properties. The physical and chemical properties of molecules and materials derive from their electronic structure, but the latter cannot be calculated exactly even with the most powerful computers because the computational cost of solving the exact equations of quantum mechanics increases exponentially with the number of electrons. The exponential cost originates from the correlations among the electrons that repel each other via Coulombic forces. In this project we have developed a new functional approximation for the ground state electronic energy that includes explicitly, and in a controllable way, the effects of the interelectronic correlations. In addition we have further developed topological concepts for classifying the electronic states of periodic ring molecules and solids. Topological concepts are very powerful because they allow us to predict subtle properties of materials and molecules using very general geometrical properties of the electron wavefunctions that do not depend on the quantitative details of the electronic interactions, which are very difficult to calculate with high accuracy. The development of a new class of controlled functional approximations for the ground state energy of molecules and materials was the main goal of the project. It has been fulfilled with the formulation of the occupation-probabilities natural orbital functional theory (OP-NOFT). This approach introduces new theoretical concepts but practical application has proved to be harder than anticipated. So far it has been utilized only at its lowest level of approximation in the context of relatively small molecules (with up to 16 atoms). The study of topological properties of the electron wavefunctions in materials was not proposed in the original proposal but was prompted during the funding period by our interaction with leading experimental groups in materials chemistry and physics at Princeton University.},
doi = {10.2172/1421605},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}