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Title: Space-Charge Simulation of Integrable Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

Abstract

Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that enables strong nonlinear focusing without generating parametric resonances. We use a Synergia space-charge simulation to investigate the application of integrable optics to a high-intensity hadron ring that could replace the Fermilab Booster. We find that incorporating integrability into the design suppresses the beam halo generated by a mismatched KV beam. Our integrable rapid cycling synchrotron (iRCS) design includes other features of modern ring design such as low momentum compaction factor and harmonically canceling sextupoles. Experimental tests of high-intensity beams in integrable lattices will take place over the next several years at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) and the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER).

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1421549
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-17-141-APC
1627468
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8th International Particle Accelerator Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, 05/14-05/19/2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Eldred, Jeffery, and Valishev, Alexander. Space-Charge Simulation of Integrable Rapid Cycling Synchrotron. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA032.
Eldred, Jeffery, & Valishev, Alexander. Space-Charge Simulation of Integrable Rapid Cycling Synchrotron. United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA032.
Eldred, Jeffery, and Valishev, Alexander. Mon . "Space-Charge Simulation of Integrable Rapid Cycling Synchrotron". United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA032. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421549.
@article{osti_1421549,
title = {Space-Charge Simulation of Integrable Rapid Cycling Synchrotron},
author = {Eldred, Jeffery and Valishev, Alexander},
abstractNote = {Integrable optics is an innovation in particle accelerator design that enables strong nonlinear focusing without generating parametric resonances. We use a Synergia space-charge simulation to investigate the application of integrable optics to a high-intensity hadron ring that could replace the Fermilab Booster. We find that incorporating integrability into the design suppresses the beam halo generated by a mismatched KV beam. Our integrable rapid cycling synchrotron (iRCS) design includes other features of modern ring design such as low momentum compaction factor and harmonically canceling sextupoles. Experimental tests of high-intensity beams in integrable lattices will take place over the next several years at the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) and the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER).},
doi = {10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA032},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • The 500-MeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) guide field is energized by a dc-biased, 30 Hz sinusoidal ac power supply, and the field strength varies between 2.81-9.81 kG. During the acceleration period, the db/dt varies in a half-sine function from zero to a maximum of 670 kG/s and back to zero. Although the average db/dt during injection is not equal to zero, efficient capture has been obtained experimentally by adjustment of the rf voltage program and the injection timing. A description is given of a simulation study of the capture process in order to understand the experimental results. 2 refs.
  • Increases in the intensity of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS-I) at Argonne National Laboratory will eventually require that the present H/sup -/ ion source be replaced with a higher current source. Laboratory studies of a Penning H/sup -/ ion source for this purpose have been carried out. The source design is essentially due to Allison. The source has operated continuously for more than a week at 15 Hz with 45 mA of H/sup -/ current during the 80 /mu/s pulse. For shorter periods, it has delivered the same current at 30 Hz with 45 /mu/s pulses. At present, twomore » technical problems prevent the source from being operational. It is not adequately reliable, and the beam emittance at 20 keV is larger than expected. 4 refs.« less
  • Preliminary tests of the new system have been completed using the extraction kicker as a ''pinger'' magnet. Data has been gathered, digitized, and the FFT calculated. The results are within expectations. The new system expands the tune measurement capabilities tremendously. The computer allows for data processing which improves signal-to-noise ratio and further increases resolution. The system will also lend itself to study beam motion other than betatron. 8 refs.
  • The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), originally designed as an injection energy booster for the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS), operated under constraints imposed by ZGS operation until December 1979. Once these restraints were removed, the RCS made rapid strides toward its near term goals of 8 /mu/A of protons for Argonne National Laboratory's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source program. Reliable 30 Hz operation was achieved in the spring of 1980 with beams as high as 2*10/sup 12/ protons per pulse and weekly average intensities of over 6 /mu/A on target. These gains resulted from better injection matching, more efficient rf turn-on andmore » dynamic chromaticity control. 8 refs.« less
  • The 500 Mev synchrotron of Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source operates at 30 Hz. Its beam spill must be locked to neutron choppers with a precision of /plus or minus/0.5 /mu/s. A chopper and an accelerator have large and different inertias. This makes synchronization by phase lock to the 60 Hz power line extremely difficult. The authors have solved the phasing problem by running both the Ring Magnet Power Supply (RMPS) of the synchrotron and the chopper motors from a common oscillator that is stable to 1 ppm and by controlling five quantities of the RMPS. The quantities controlled bymore » feedback loops are dc current, injection current, ejection current, resonant frequency, and the phase shift between the synchrotron peak field and the chopper window. 4 refs.« less