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Title: HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy

Abstract

A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Huddersfield U.
  2. Birmingham U.
  3. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1421548
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-17-580-AD
1627543
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8th International Particle Accelerator Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, 05/14-05/19/2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Taylor, Jordan, Edgecock, Thomas, Green, Stuart, and Johnstone, Carol. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA133.
Taylor, Jordan, Edgecock, Thomas, Green, Stuart, & Johnstone, Carol. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy. United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA133.
Taylor, Jordan, Edgecock, Thomas, Green, Stuart, and Johnstone, Carol. Mon . "HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy". United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA133. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421548.
@article{osti_1421548,
title = {HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy},
author = {Taylor, Jordan and Edgecock, Thomas and Green, Stuart and Johnstone, Carol},
abstractNote = {A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.},
doi = {10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-THPVA133},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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