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Title: Resonance Control for Future Linear Accelerators

Abstract

Many of the next generation of particle accelerators (LCLS II, PIP II) are designed for relatively low beam loading. Low beam loading requirement means the cavities can operate with narrow bandwidths, minimizing capital and base operational costs of the RF power system. With such narrow bandwidths, however, cavity detuning from microphonics or dynamic Lorentz Force Detuning becomes a significant factor, and in some cases can significantly increase both the acquisition cost and the operational cost of the machine. In addition to the efforts to passive environmental detuning reduction (microphonics) active resonance control for the SRF cavities for next generation linear machine will be required. State of the art in the field of the SRF Cavity active resonance control and the results from the recent efforts at FNAL will be presented in this talk.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Fermilab
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1421540
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-16-742-TD
1633160
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 28th International Linear Accelerator Conference, East Lansing, Michigan, 09/25-09/30/2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Schappert, Warren. Resonance Control for Future Linear Accelerators. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2016-TU2A03.
Schappert, Warren. Resonance Control for Future Linear Accelerators. United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2016-TU2A03.
Schappert, Warren. Mon . "Resonance Control for Future Linear Accelerators". United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2016-TU2A03. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421540.
@article{osti_1421540,
title = {Resonance Control for Future Linear Accelerators},
author = {Schappert, Warren},
abstractNote = {Many of the next generation of particle accelerators (LCLS II, PIP II) are designed for relatively low beam loading. Low beam loading requirement means the cavities can operate with narrow bandwidths, minimizing capital and base operational costs of the RF power system. With such narrow bandwidths, however, cavity detuning from microphonics or dynamic Lorentz Force Detuning becomes a significant factor, and in some cases can significantly increase both the acquisition cost and the operational cost of the machine. In addition to the efforts to passive environmental detuning reduction (microphonics) active resonance control for the SRF cavities for next generation linear machine will be required. State of the art in the field of the SRF Cavity active resonance control and the results from the recent efforts at FNAL will be presented in this talk.},
doi = {10.18429/JACoW-LINAC2016-TU2A03},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • The general characteristics of heavy-ion linacs are summarized, with emphasis on the similarities and differences of systems based on different technologies. The main design considerations of superconducting linacs are outlined, the many projects based on this technology are listed, and a new concept for a superconducting injector linac is described. The role of RFQ structures for heavy-ion acceleration is summarized. A concluding section lists some probable applications of heavy-ion accelerators during the next decade. 17 references, 5 figures, 1 table.
  • In this paper, the author discusses ion effects relevant to future storage rings and linear colliders. The author first reviews the conventional ion effects observed in present storage rings and then discusses how these effects will differ in the next generation of rings and linacs. These future accelerators operate in a new regime because of the high current long bunch trains and the very small transverse beam emittances. Usually, storage rings are designed with ion clearing gaps to prevent ion trapping between bunch trains or beam revolutions. Regardless, ions generated within a single bunch train can have significant effects. Themore » same is true in transport lines and linacs, where typical vacuum pressures are relatively high. Amongst other effects, the author addresses the tune spreads due to the ions and the resulting filamentation which can severely limit emittance correction techniques in future linear colliders, the bunch-to-bunch coupling due to the ions which can cause a multi-bunch instability with fast growth rates, and the betatron coupling and beam halo creation which limit the vertical emittance and beam lifetimes.« less
  • Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness.
  • Two companion papers at this meeting have introduced the subject of high intensity linacs for materials research and for radioactive waste transmutation; Prof. Kaneko's paper Intense Proton Accelerator,'' and my paper Accelerator-Based Intense Neutron Source for Materials R D.'' I will expand on those remarks to briefly outline some of the extensive work that has been done at Los Alamos toward those two application areas, plus a third --- the production of tritium in an accelerator-based facility (APT--Accelerator Production of Tritium). 1 ref., 11 figs.
  • Some of the requirements imposed on future linear accelerators to be used in electron-positron colliders are reviewed, as well as some approaches presently being examined for meeting those requirements. RF sources for use in these linacs are described, as well as wakefields, single bunches, and multiple-bunch trains. (LEW)