skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Application of benchmarked kinetic resistive wall mode stability codes to ITER, including additional physics

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA
  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA
  3. General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608, USA
  4. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA
  5. Physics Department, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1420642
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-09CH11466; FC02-04ER54698; FG02-93ER54215; FG02-95ER54309; FG02-99ER54524; SC0014196
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 11; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 16:15:15; Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Berkery, J. W., Wang, Z. R., Sabbagh, S. A., Liu, Y. Q., Betti, R., and Guazzotto, L. Application of benchmarked kinetic resistive wall mode stability codes to ITER, including additional physics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4989503.
Berkery, J. W., Wang, Z. R., Sabbagh, S. A., Liu, Y. Q., Betti, R., & Guazzotto, L. Application of benchmarked kinetic resistive wall mode stability codes to ITER, including additional physics. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4989503.
Berkery, J. W., Wang, Z. R., Sabbagh, S. A., Liu, Y. Q., Betti, R., and Guazzotto, L. 2017. "Application of benchmarked kinetic resistive wall mode stability codes to ITER, including additional physics". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4989503.
@article{osti_1420642,
title = {Application of benchmarked kinetic resistive wall mode stability codes to ITER, including additional physics},
author = {Berkery, J. W. and Wang, Z. R. and Sabbagh, S. A. and Liu, Y. Q. and Betti, R. and Guazzotto, L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4989503},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 11,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on November 21, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Save / Share:
  • The resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in high-beta tokamaks is stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and kinetic effects. Kinetic modification of ideal stability calculated with the 'MISK' code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)] is outlined. For an advanced scenario ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] plasma, the present calculation finds that alpha particles are required for RWM stability at presently expected levels of plasma rotation. Kinetic stabilization theory is tested in an experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40,more » 557 (2000)] that produced marginally stable plasmas with various energetic particle contents. Plasmas with the highest and lowest energetic particle content agree with calculations predicting that increased energetic particle pressure is stabilizing but does not alter the nonmonotonic dependence of stability on plasma rotation due to thermal particle resonances. Presently, the full MISK model, including thermal particles and an isotropic slowing-down distribution function for energetic particles, overpredicts stability in NSTX experiments. Minor alteration of either effect in the theory may yield agreement; several possibilities are discussed.« less
  • The resistive wall mode instability in tokamak plasmas has a complex frequency which can be determined by a dispersion relation that is cubic, in general, leading to three distinct roots. A simplified model of the dispersion relation, including kinetic effects, is presented and used to explore the behavior of these roots. By changing the plasma rotation frequency, it is shown that one root has a slow mode rotation frequency (less than the inverse wall time) while the other two rotate more quickly, one leading and one lagging the plasma rotation frequency. When realistic experimental parameters from the National Spherical Torusmore » Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are used, however, only one slow rotating, near-marginal stability root is found, consistent with present experiments and more detailed calculations with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)]. Electron collisionality acts to stabilize one of the rotating roots, while ion collisionality can stabilize the other. In devices with low rotation and low collisionality, these two rotating roots may manifest themselves, but they are likely to remain stable.« less
  • Two approaches for studying the damping of resistive wall modes due to wave particle resonant interactions are discussed. One approach uses the eigenfunction from an ideal MHD code combined with the resonant particle damping calculated from a drift-kinetic {delta}f- method formulation. This perturbative approach treats the wave-particle interaction precisely, but does not include the back-effect of the kinetic terms on the eigenfunction structure. In the alternate non-perturbative approach the kinetic terms are included in an MHD description via the pressure tensor. This non-perturbative approach includes the resonances due to the bounce and precessional drifts subject to certain approximations. Comparisons betweenmore » the two approaches and conclusions on the dominant stabilizing mechanisms are presented.« less
  • The impact of collisionless, energy-independent, and energy-dependent collisionality models on the kinetic stability of the resistive wall mode is examined for high pressure plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Future devices will have decreased collisionality, which previous stability models predict to be universally destabilizing. In contrast, in kinetic theory reduced ion-ion collisions are shown to lead to a significant stability increase when the plasma rotation frequency is in a stabilizing resonance with the ion precession drift frequency. When the plasma is in a reduced stability state with rotation in between resonances, collisionality will have little effect on stability.