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Title: Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

Abstract

This thesis presents results on the study of electromagnetic (EM) activity in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector. The LArTPC detector technology provides bubble-chamber like information on neutrino interaction final states, necessary to perform precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters. Accelerator-based oscillation experiments heavily rely on the appearance channel ! e to make such measurements. Identifying and reconstructing the energy of the outgoing electrons from such interactions is therefore crucial for their success. This work focuses on two sources of EM activity: Michel electrons in the 10-50 MeV energy range, and photons from 0 decay in the 30-300 MeV range. Studies of biases in the energy reconstruction measurement, and energy resolution are performed. The impact of shower topology at different energies is discussed, and the importance of thresholding and other reconstruction effects on producing an asymmetric and biased energy measurement are highlighted. This work further presents a study of the calorimetric separation of electrons and photons with a focus on the shower energy dependence of the separation power.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Columbia U.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1420402
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-THESIS-2018-02
1654724
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Caratelli, David. Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1420402.
Caratelli, David. Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. United States. doi:10.2172/1420402.
Caratelli, David. Mon . "Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber". United States. doi:10.2172/1420402. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1420402.
@article{osti_1420402,
title = {Study of Electromagnetic Interactions in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber},
author = {Caratelli, David},
abstractNote = {This thesis presents results on the study of electromagnetic (EM) activity in the MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detector. The LArTPC detector technology provides bubble-chamber like information on neutrino interaction final states, necessary to perform precision measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters. Accelerator-based oscillation experiments heavily rely on the appearance channel ! e to make such measurements. Identifying and reconstructing the energy of the outgoing electrons from such interactions is therefore crucial for their success. This work focuses on two sources of EM activity: Michel electrons in the 10-50 MeV energy range, and photons from 0 decay in the 30-300 MeV range. Studies of biases in the energy reconstruction measurement, and energy resolution are performed. The impact of shower topology at different energies is discussed, and the importance of thresholding and other reconstruction effects on producing an asymmetric and biased energy measurement are highlighted. This work further presents a study of the calorimetric separation of electrons and photons with a focus on the shower energy dependence of the separation power.},
doi = {10.2172/1420402},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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