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Title: Initial stages of ion beam-induced phase transformations in Gd 2 O 3 and Lu 2 O 3

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  2. Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1420361
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; SC0001089
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 7; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-13 13:52:49; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Chien-Hung, Tracy, Cameron L., Wang, Chenxu, Lang, Maik, and Ewing, Rodney C.. Initial stages of ion beam-induced phase transformations in Gd 2 O 3 and Lu 2 O 3. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5013018.
Chen, Chien-Hung, Tracy, Cameron L., Wang, Chenxu, Lang, Maik, & Ewing, Rodney C.. Initial stages of ion beam-induced phase transformations in Gd 2 O 3 and Lu 2 O 3. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5013018.
Chen, Chien-Hung, Tracy, Cameron L., Wang, Chenxu, Lang, Maik, and Ewing, Rodney C.. 2018. "Initial stages of ion beam-induced phase transformations in Gd 2 O 3 and Lu 2 O 3". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5013018.
@article{osti_1420361,
title = {Initial stages of ion beam-induced phase transformations in Gd 2 O 3 and Lu 2 O 3},
author = {Chen, Chien-Hung and Tracy, Cameron L. and Wang, Chenxu and Lang, Maik and Ewing, Rodney C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.5013018},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 2
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on February 13, 2019
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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