skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods with various space discretizations in poroelasticity: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station Texas USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419901
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0028973
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-08 05:26:11; Journal ID: ISSN 0029-5981
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Yoon, Hyun C., and Kim, Jihoon. Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods with various space discretizations in poroelasticity: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods. United Kingdom: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/nme.5762.
Yoon, Hyun C., & Kim, Jihoon. Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods with various space discretizations in poroelasticity: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/nme.5762.
Yoon, Hyun C., and Kim, Jihoon. 2018. "Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods with various space discretizations in poroelasticity: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods". United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/nme.5762.
@article{osti_1419901,
title = {Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods with various space discretizations in poroelasticity: Spatial stability for the monolithic and sequential methods},
author = {Yoon, Hyun C. and Kim, Jihoon},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/nme.5762},
journal = {International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2018,
month = 2
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on February 8, 2019
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Save / Share:
  • There are three commonly recognized second-order self-adjoint forms of the neutron transport equation: the even-parity equations, the odd-parity equations, and the self-adjoint angular flux equations. Because all of these equations contain second-order spatial derivatives and are self-adjoint for the mono-energetic case, standard continuous finite-element discretization techniques have proved quite effective when applied to the spatial variables. We first derive analogs of these equations for the case of time-dependent radiative transfer. The primary unknowns for these equations are functions of the angular intensity rather than the angular flux, hence the analog of the self-adjoint angular flux equation is referred to asmore » the self-adjoint angular intensity equation. Then we describe a general, arbitrary-order, continuous spatial finite-element approach that is applied to each of the three equations in conjunction with backward-Euler differencing in time. We refer to it as the 'standard' technique. We also introduce an alternative spatial discretization scheme for the self-adjoint angular intensity equation that requires far fewer unknowns than the standard method, but appears to give comparable accuracy. Computational results are given that demonstrate the validity of both of these discretization schemes.« less
  • This technical note compares the results for streaming along a single-ray direction from linear discontinuous finite element discretizations of the transport equation using both Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin weight functions. The utility of a slope limiter to remove extrema from the transport solution is investigated as an alternative to mass lumping of the removal operator; the latter procedure introduces significant numerical diffusion and can destroy the fidelity of the solution. Results are presented for single-ray propagation in slab geometry and two-dimensional planar geometry.
  • The equations governing the propagation of inertia-gravity waves in geophysical fluid flows are discretized on the A, B, C, and D grids according to the classical forward-backward on time and centered on space (FBTCS) numerical scheme. The von Neumann stability analysis is performed and it is shown that the stability condition of the inertia-gravity waves scheme is more restrictive, at least by a factor of [radical]2, than that concerning pure gravity waves, whatever the magnitude of the Coriolis parameter. Finally, the general necessary and sufficient stability condition is derived for the A, B and C grids, while, on the Dmore » grid, the stability condition has been obtained only in particular cases. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Experimental study of the reverse annealing of the effective concentration of ionized space charges (N{sub eff}, also called effective doping or impurity concentration) of neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors fabricated on wafers with various thermal oxides has been conducted at room temperature (RT) and elevated temperature (ET). Various thermal oxidations with temperatures ranging from 975 C to 1,200 C with and without trichloroethane (TCA), which result in different concentrations of oxygen and carbon impurities, have been used. It has been found that, the RT annealing of the N{sub eff} is hindered initially (t < 42 days after the radiation)more » for detectors made on the oxides with high carbon concentrations, and there was no carbon effect on the long term (t > 42 days after the radiation) N{sub eff} reverse annealing. No apparent effect of oxygen on the stability of N{sub eff} has been observed at RT. At elevated temperature (80 C), no significant difference in annealing behavior has been found for detectors fabricated on silicon wafers with various thermal oxides. It is apparent that for the initial stages (first and/or second) of N{sub eff} reverse annealing, there may be no dependence on the oxygen and carbon concentrations in the ranges studied.« less