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Title: Increased postural sway in persons with multiple sclerosis during short-term exposure to warm ambient temperatures

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419690
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Gait & Posture
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-06 04:14:15; Journal ID: ISSN 0966-6362
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Poh, Paula Y. S., Adams, Amy N., Huang, Mu, Allen, Dustin R., Davis, Scott L., Tseng, Anna S., and Crandall, Craig G. Increased postural sway in persons with multiple sclerosis during short-term exposure to warm ambient temperatures. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.01.025.
Poh, Paula Y. S., Adams, Amy N., Huang, Mu, Allen, Dustin R., Davis, Scott L., Tseng, Anna S., & Crandall, Craig G. Increased postural sway in persons with multiple sclerosis during short-term exposure to warm ambient temperatures. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.01.025.
Poh, Paula Y. S., Adams, Amy N., Huang, Mu, Allen, Dustin R., Davis, Scott L., Tseng, Anna S., and Crandall, Craig G. Wed . "Increased postural sway in persons with multiple sclerosis during short-term exposure to warm ambient temperatures". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.01.025.
@article{osti_1419690,
title = {Increased postural sway in persons with multiple sclerosis during short-term exposure to warm ambient temperatures},
author = {Poh, Paula Y. S. and Adams, Amy N. and Huang, Mu and Allen, Dustin R. and Davis, Scott L. and Tseng, Anna S. and Crandall, Craig G.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.01.025},
journal = {Gait & Posture},
number = C,
volume = 53,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2017.01.025

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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