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Title: Stabilizing a Vanadium Oxide Catalyst by Supporting on a Metal-Organic Framework

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston IL- 60208 USA
  2. X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL- 60439 USA
  3. Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston IL- 60208 USA, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 Saudi Arabia
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419597
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012702; AC0206CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ChemCatChem
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-05 10:13:51; Journal ID: ISSN 1867-3880
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cui, Yuexing, Rimoldi, Martino, Platero-Prats, Ana E., Chapman, Karena W., Hupp, Joseph T., and Farha, Omar K. Stabilizing a Vanadium Oxide Catalyst by Supporting on a Metal-Organic Framework. Germany: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/cctc.201701658.
Cui, Yuexing, Rimoldi, Martino, Platero-Prats, Ana E., Chapman, Karena W., Hupp, Joseph T., & Farha, Omar K. Stabilizing a Vanadium Oxide Catalyst by Supporting on a Metal-Organic Framework. Germany. doi:10.1002/cctc.201701658.
Cui, Yuexing, Rimoldi, Martino, Platero-Prats, Ana E., Chapman, Karena W., Hupp, Joseph T., and Farha, Omar K. Mon . "Stabilizing a Vanadium Oxide Catalyst by Supporting on a Metal-Organic Framework". Germany. doi:10.1002/cctc.201701658.
@article{osti_1419597,
title = {Stabilizing a Vanadium Oxide Catalyst by Supporting on a Metal-Organic Framework},
author = {Cui, Yuexing and Rimoldi, Martino and Platero-Prats, Ana E. and Chapman, Karena W. and Hupp, Joseph T. and Farha, Omar K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/cctc.201701658},
journal = {ChemCatChem},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Germany},
year = {Mon Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Mon Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on February 5, 2019
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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