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Title: Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1419546
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0002956; NA0002719; NA0001944; B614207
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
High Energy Density Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 22; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-03 02:11:38; Journal ID: ISSN 1574-1818
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Keiter, P. A., Trantham, M., Malamud, G., Klein, S. R., Davis, J., VanDervort, R., Shvarts, D., Drake, R. P., Stone, J. M., Fraenkel, M., Frank, Y., and Raicher, E. Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.hedp.2017.01.002.
Keiter, P. A., Trantham, M., Malamud, G., Klein, S. R., Davis, J., VanDervort, R., Shvarts, D., Drake, R. P., Stone, J. M., Fraenkel, M., Frank, Y., & Raicher, E. Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.hedp.2017.01.002.
Keiter, P. A., Trantham, M., Malamud, G., Klein, S. R., Davis, J., VanDervort, R., Shvarts, D., Drake, R. P., Stone, J. M., Fraenkel, M., Frank, Y., and Raicher, E. Wed . "Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.hedp.2017.01.002.
@article{osti_1419546,
title = {Design of laboratory experiments to study radiation-driven implosions},
author = {Keiter, P. A. and Trantham, M. and Malamud, G. and Klein, S. R. and Davis, J. and VanDervort, R. and Shvarts, D. and Drake, R. P. and Stone, J. M. and Fraenkel, M. and Frank, Y. and Raicher, E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.hedp.2017.01.002},
journal = {High Energy Density Physics},
number = C,
volume = 22,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.hedp.2017.01.002

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
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  • This paper analyzes the requirements of a photoionization-front experiment that could be driven in the laboratory, using thermal sources to produce the necessary flux of ionizing photons. It reports several associated conclusions. Such experiments will need to employ the largest available facilities, capable of delivering many kJ to MJ of energy to an X-ray source. They will use this source to irradiate a volume of neutral gas, likely of N, on a scale of a few mm to a few cm, increasing with source energy. For a gas pressure of several to ten atmospheres at room temperature, and a sourcemore » temperature near 100 eV, one will be able to drive a photoionization front through a system of tens to hundreds of photon mean free paths. The front should make the familiar transition from the so-called R-Type to D-Type as the radiation flux diminishes with distance. The N is likely to reach the He-like state. Preheating from the energetic photons appears unlikely to become large enough to alter the essential dynamics of the front beyond some layer near the surface. For well-chosen experimental conditions, competing energy transport mechanisms are small.« less
  • This study analyzes the requirements of a photoionization-front experiment that could be driven in the laboratory, using thermal sources to produce the necessary flux of ionizing photons. It reports several associated conclusions. Such experiments will need to employ the largest available facilities, capable of delivering many kJ to MJ of energy to an x-ray source. They will use this source to irradiate a volume of neutral gas, likely of N, on a scale of a few mm to a few cm, increasing with source energy. For a gas pressure of several to ten atmospheres at room temperature, and a sourcemore » temperature near 100 eV, one will be able to drive a photoionization front through a system of tens to hundreds of photon mean free paths. The front should make the familiar transition from the so-called R-Type to D-Type as the radiation flux diminishes with distance. The N is likely to reach the He-like state. Preheating from the energetic photons appears unlikely to become large enough to alter the essential dynamics of the front beyond some layer near the surface. For well-chosen experimental conditions, competing energy transport mechanisms are small.« less
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