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Title: Estimation of U.S. refinery water consumption and allocation to refinery products

Abstract

Increasing stress on the global water supply necessitates the measurement of water consumption as a sustainability metric to evaluate energy production, including the production of transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel) at petroleum refineries. This study estimated refinery water consumption for petroleum fuels by considering three typical refinery configurations (cracking, light coking, and heavy coking) that process different crude qualities (e.g., American Petroleum Institute Gravity (API) gravity and sulfur content). The results showed that refinery water consumption was 0.34, 0.44, and 0.47 bbl water/bbl crude (L water/L crude) for cracking, light coking, and heavy coking configurations, respectively. The water consumption for a specific refinery product was estimated using an energy allocation approach at the process unit level. The results indicated that gasoline production consumes the largest amount of water, 0.60–0.71 gal water/gal gasoline (0.60-0.71 L water/L gasoline), due to the energy-intensive (and thus water-intensive) processing of gasoline components (mainly sourced from alkylation, reformer, and fluid catalytic cracking units). In contrast, jet fuel production consumes the least water, 0.09 gal water/gal jet fuel, for all three refinery configurations, because it is sourced directly from the crude distillation unit with minimal post-treating. The consumption of diesel is most sensitive to refinery configurationmore » with 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40 gal water/gal diesel (L water/ L diesel) for cracking, light coking and heavy coking configurations, respectively. This is mainly because as configuration complexity increases to process heavier and sourer crudes, a sizable burden of hydrogen production from steam methane reforming unit is allocated to diesel fuel production (including diesel sulfur removal). In conclusion, the trend of water consumption associated with these refinery products is consistent with the energy consumption for their production.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  2. Jacobs Consultancy, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1419527
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1461180
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Fuel
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 221; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-2361
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; refinery; water; consumption; configuration; allocation; products

Citation Formats

Sun, Pingping, Elgowainy, Amgad, Wang, Michael, Han, Jeongwoo, and Henderson, Robert J. Estimation of U.S. refinery water consumption and allocation to refinery products. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.07.089.
Sun, Pingping, Elgowainy, Amgad, Wang, Michael, Han, Jeongwoo, & Henderson, Robert J. Estimation of U.S. refinery water consumption and allocation to refinery products. United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.07.089.
Sun, Pingping, Elgowainy, Amgad, Wang, Michael, Han, Jeongwoo, and Henderson, Robert J. Sat . "Estimation of U.S. refinery water consumption and allocation to refinery products". United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2017.07.089.
@article{osti_1419527,
title = {Estimation of U.S. refinery water consumption and allocation to refinery products},
author = {Sun, Pingping and Elgowainy, Amgad and Wang, Michael and Han, Jeongwoo and Henderson, Robert J.},
abstractNote = {Increasing stress on the global water supply necessitates the measurement of water consumption as a sustainability metric to evaluate energy production, including the production of transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel) at petroleum refineries. This study estimated refinery water consumption for petroleum fuels by considering three typical refinery configurations (cracking, light coking, and heavy coking) that process different crude qualities (e.g., American Petroleum Institute Gravity (API) gravity and sulfur content). The results showed that refinery water consumption was 0.34, 0.44, and 0.47 bbl water/bbl crude (L water/L crude) for cracking, light coking, and heavy coking configurations, respectively. The water consumption for a specific refinery product was estimated using an energy allocation approach at the process unit level. The results indicated that gasoline production consumes the largest amount of water, 0.60–0.71 gal water/gal gasoline (0.60-0.71 L water/L gasoline), due to the energy-intensive (and thus water-intensive) processing of gasoline components (mainly sourced from alkylation, reformer, and fluid catalytic cracking units). In contrast, jet fuel production consumes the least water, 0.09 gal water/gal jet fuel, for all three refinery configurations, because it is sourced directly from the crude distillation unit with minimal post-treating. The consumption of diesel is most sensitive to refinery configuration with 0.20, 0.30, and 0.40 gal water/gal diesel (L water/ L diesel) for cracking, light coking and heavy coking configurations, respectively. This is mainly because as configuration complexity increases to process heavier and sourer crudes, a sizable burden of hydrogen production from steam methane reforming unit is allocated to diesel fuel production (including diesel sulfur removal). In conclusion, the trend of water consumption associated with these refinery products is consistent with the energy consumption for their production.},
doi = {10.1016/j.fuel.2017.07.089},
journal = {Fuel},
number = C,
volume = 221,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Sat Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.fuel.2017.07.089

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