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Title: Residential Simulation Tool

Abstract

Residential Simulation Tool was developed to understand the impact of residential load consumption on utilities including the role of demand response. This is complicated as many different residential loads exist and are utilized for different purposes. The tool models human behavior and contributes this to load utilization, which contributes to the electrical consumption prediction by the tool. The tool integrates a number of different databases from Department of Energy and other Government websites to support the load consumption prediction.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. ORNL
  2. ORISE
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419421
Report Number(s):
Residential Simulation Tool; 005581IBMPC00
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
005581
Software CPU:
IBMPC
Open Source:
Yes
Source Code Available:
Yes
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Starke, Michael R, Abdelaziz, Omar A, Jackson, Rogerick K, and Johnson, Brandon J. Residential Simulation Tool. Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1419421. Vers. 00. USDOE. 1 Oct. 2017. Web.
Starke, Michael R, Abdelaziz, Omar A, Jackson, Rogerick K, & Johnson, Brandon J. (2017, October 1). Residential Simulation Tool (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1419421.
Starke, Michael R, Abdelaziz, Omar A, Jackson, Rogerick K, and Johnson, Brandon J. Residential Simulation Tool. Computer software. Version 00. October 1, 2017. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1419421.
@misc{osti_1419421,
title = {Residential Simulation Tool, Version 00},
author = {Starke, Michael R and Abdelaziz, Omar A and Jackson, Rogerick K and Johnson, Brandon J},
abstractNote = {Residential Simulation Tool was developed to understand the impact of residential load consumption on utilities including the role of demand response. This is complicated as many different residential loads exist and are utilized for different purposes. The tool models human behavior and contributes this to load utilization, which contributes to the electrical consumption prediction by the tool. The tool integrates a number of different databases from Department of Energy and other Government websites to support the load consumption prediction.},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1419421},
doi = {},
year = 2017,
month = ,
note =
}

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