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Title: Metagenomic reconstruction of nitrogen cycling pathways in a CO 2 -enriched grassland ecosystem

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1419383
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0004601; FG02-96ER62291
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-02 14:47:04; Journal ID: ISSN 0038-0717
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tu, Qichao, He, Zhili, Wu, Liyou, Xue, Kai, Xie, Gary, Chain, Patrick, Reich, Peter B., Hobbie, Sarah E., and Zhou, Jizhong. Metagenomic reconstruction of nitrogen cycling pathways in a CO 2 -enriched grassland ecosystem. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.12.017.
Tu, Qichao, He, Zhili, Wu, Liyou, Xue, Kai, Xie, Gary, Chain, Patrick, Reich, Peter B., Hobbie, Sarah E., & Zhou, Jizhong. Metagenomic reconstruction of nitrogen cycling pathways in a CO 2 -enriched grassland ecosystem. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.12.017.
Tu, Qichao, He, Zhili, Wu, Liyou, Xue, Kai, Xie, Gary, Chain, Patrick, Reich, Peter B., Hobbie, Sarah E., and Zhou, Jizhong. Wed . "Metagenomic reconstruction of nitrogen cycling pathways in a CO 2 -enriched grassland ecosystem". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.12.017.
@article{osti_1419383,
title = {Metagenomic reconstruction of nitrogen cycling pathways in a CO 2 -enriched grassland ecosystem},
author = {Tu, Qichao and He, Zhili and Wu, Liyou and Xue, Kai and Xie, Gary and Chain, Patrick and Reich, Peter B. and Hobbie, Sarah E. and Zhou, Jizhong},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.12.017},
journal = {Soil Biology and Biochemistry},
number = C,
volume = 106,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.12.017

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • In 1994 we initiated a long term study on the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on ecosystem function and biodiversity in a species rich grassland near Basel, Switzerland. Natural vegetation was exposed to ambient and elevated (600{mu}l 1{sup -1}) CO{sub 2} using open-top chambers. We measured ecosystem carbon and water fluxes for several 24hr. periods during the growing season by partially closing the top of the chambers. During the first 3 months of CO{sub 2} enrichment, mean net ecosystem carbon uptake at high photon flux density increased by 37%. The relative photosynthetic gain was diminished as photon flux density decreased.more » Dark respiration, and midday soil CO{sub 2}-evolution did not differ between treatments. Midday evapotranspiration decreased by 17%, probably due to stomatal responses, since LAI did not change. Since the extra carbon has not yet appeared in either aboveground, belowground, or microbial biomass, we hypothesize that a major part of the extra carbon was sequestered into the soil compartment.« less
  • Determining whether the terrestrial biosphere will be a source or sink of carbon (C) under a future climate of elevated CO2 (eCO2) and warming requires accurate quantification of gross primary production (GPP), the largest flux of C in the global C cycle. We evaluated six years (2007-2012) of flux-derived GPP data from the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment, situated in a mixed prairie grassland in Wyoming (USA). The GPP data were fitted to a mixed effects model that extended a light response model to include the effects of environmental (soil water content, vegetation greenness, nitrogen) and meteorological datamore » (air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, photosynthetically active radiation) at current and past times. The stimulation of the cumulative six-year GPP by warming (20%, P=0.06) and eCO2 (19%, P=0.14) were primarily driven by enhanced C uptake during spring (96%, P=0.003) and fall (115%, P=0.001), respectively. These enhancements were consistent across each year, suggesting mechanisms for extending the growing season. Vapor pressure deficit from 1-3 days prior was the most significant predictor of temporalvariability in GPP and for explaining treatment differences in GPP, suggesting that atmospheric drought plays an important role for predicting GPP now and under future climate conditions.« less
  • Potential increases in rhizodeposition under elevated CO{sub 2} has been hypothesized to stimulate microbial activity and, therefore, alter plant nitrogen availability. We investigated nitrogen relations of a nutrient poor calcareous grassland. Plant communities with 5, 12 or 31 of the species locally present were established in field plots and exposed to ambient (356{mu}l l{sup -1}) or elevated (600{mu}l l{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} using open-top chambers. After 5 months of CO{sub 2} exposure, soil microbial biomass, microbial activity, plant above- and belowground biomass and nitrogen contents were measured. No significant effect of elevated CO{sub 2} or plant species number onmore » soil microbial biomass or activity was observed. Elevated CO{sub 2} led to significant increases in aboveground plant biomass in the 31 spp. community only. Under elevated CO{sub 2}, net ecosystem CO{sub 2} gas exchange and fine root biomass increased in all communities. Whole plot plant nitrogen uptake did not change, but significant increases in C:N ratios of N rich forbs were found. We conclude that, although rhizodeposition appears to have increased under elevated CO{sub 2}, neither microbial biomass nor activity changed significantly. Finally, the increased amount of fine roots observed under elevated CO{sub 2} led to intensified root exploration of soil, but did not result in increased total plant nitrogen uptake.« less