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Title: Evaluation of modeled global vegetation carbon dynamics: Analysis based on global carbon flux and above-ground biomass data

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1419142
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-04ER63917; FG02-04ER63911
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecological Modelling
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-01 16:19:53; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3800
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xue, Bao-Lin, Guo, Qinghua, Hu, Tianyu, Wang, Guoqiang, Wang, Yongcai, Tao, Shengli, Su, Yanjun, Liu, Jin, and Zhao, Xiaoqian. Evaluation of modeled global vegetation carbon dynamics: Analysis based on global carbon flux and above-ground biomass data. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.04.012.
Xue, Bao-Lin, Guo, Qinghua, Hu, Tianyu, Wang, Guoqiang, Wang, Yongcai, Tao, Shengli, Su, Yanjun, Liu, Jin, & Zhao, Xiaoqian. Evaluation of modeled global vegetation carbon dynamics: Analysis based on global carbon flux and above-ground biomass data. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.04.012.
Xue, Bao-Lin, Guo, Qinghua, Hu, Tianyu, Wang, Guoqiang, Wang, Yongcai, Tao, Shengli, Su, Yanjun, Liu, Jin, and Zhao, Xiaoqian. 2017. "Evaluation of modeled global vegetation carbon dynamics: Analysis based on global carbon flux and above-ground biomass data". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.04.012.
@article{osti_1419142,
title = {Evaluation of modeled global vegetation carbon dynamics: Analysis based on global carbon flux and above-ground biomass data},
author = {Xue, Bao-Lin and Guo, Qinghua and Hu, Tianyu and Wang, Guoqiang and Wang, Yongcai and Tao, Shengli and Su, Yanjun and Liu, Jin and Zhao, Xiaoqian},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2017.04.012},
journal = {Ecological Modelling},
number = C,
volume = 355,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on April 24, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Montemore » Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.« less
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