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Title: Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NIHFOREIGN
OSTI Identifier:
1419074
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Biological Chemistry; Journal Volume: 291; Journal Issue: 40
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Choi, Jeong-Yun, Patra, Amritaj, Yeom, Mina, Lee, Young-Sam, Zhang, Qianqian, Egli, Martin, and Guengerich, F. Peter. Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.748285.
Choi, Jeong-Yun, Patra, Amritaj, Yeom, Mina, Lee, Young-Sam, Zhang, Qianqian, Egli, Martin, & Guengerich, F. Peter. Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι. United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.748285.
Choi, Jeong-Yun, Patra, Amritaj, Yeom, Mina, Lee, Young-Sam, Zhang, Qianqian, Egli, Martin, and Guengerich, F. Peter. 2016. "Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι". United States. doi:10.1074/jbc.M116.748285.
@article{osti_1419074,
title = {Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι},
author = {Choi, Jeong-Yun and Patra, Amritaj and Yeom, Mina and Lee, Young-Sam and Zhang, Qianqian and Egli, Martin and Guengerich, F. Peter},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1074/jbc.M116.748285},
journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
number = 40,
volume = 291,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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