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Title: Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NIHHHMI
OSTI Identifier:
1419063
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 49
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Cogan, Dillon P., Hudson, Graham A., Zhang, Zhengan, Pogorelov, Taras V., van der Donk, Wilfred A., Mitchell, Douglas A., and Nair, Satish K. Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1716035114.
Cogan, Dillon P., Hudson, Graham A., Zhang, Zhengan, Pogorelov, Taras V., van der Donk, Wilfred A., Mitchell, Douglas A., & Nair, Satish K. Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1716035114.
Cogan, Dillon P., Hudson, Graham A., Zhang, Zhengan, Pogorelov, Taras V., van der Donk, Wilfred A., Mitchell, Douglas A., and Nair, Satish K. 2017. "Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1716035114.
@article{osti_1419063,
title = {Structural insights into enzymatic [4+2] aza -cycloaddition in thiopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis},
author = {Cogan, Dillon P. and Hudson, Graham A. and Zhang, Zhengan and Pogorelov, Taras V. and van der Donk, Wilfred A. and Mitchell, Douglas A. and Nair, Satish K.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1716035114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 49,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}
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