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Title: Soboba Community Energy Solar Project - Phase 2

Abstract

This is the final technical report for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians' second community solar project. Since time immemorial the descendants of the Soboba people are those whom have lived on and occupied the land that is presently known as the cities of San Jacinto, Hemet, Valle Vista and Winchester. On June 19, 1883, President Chester Arthur by Executive Order established the Soboba Indian Reservation, a 3,172-acre tract which included the Soboba village and the adjacent hills. The President had limited authority as he was only able to set aside public land for the establishment of a reservation and had no authority to take private land. Thus the Soboba village; cultivated lands and major springs were part of Rancho San Jacinto Viejo and belonged to Matthew Byrne. Today the Soboba Indian Reservation lies in the lower reaches of the San Jacinto Mountains, across the San Jacinto River from the city of San Jacinto. The Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians was awarded a community solar grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The incorporated cities of San Jacinto and Hemet, and the unincorporated community of Valle Vista border the Reservation. All three of these surrounding communities have experienced tremendous populationmore » growth over the past two decades, with slower growth during the recent economic downturn. The Tribal community that benefits from under this grant includes 1,161 enrolled members, the majority of which live on the reservation. Nearly 41% of the enrolled members are youth, age 18 and under. The elders and community leaders value preserving and maintaining the Luiseño and Cahuilla cultures and Tribal structure for future generations. The proposed project was administered from the Tribal Administration offices located on the reservation. The Soboba Tribal Government consists of five Tribal Members who are elected by the general membership to Tribal Council for a staggered two year term. The Chairman/Chairwoman is elected by a majority vote of the general membership but the positions for Vice-Chair, Tribal Secretary, Tribal Treasurer and Sergeant at Arms are decided by the elected council. The Soboba Tribal Administration encompasses several departments that serve the needs of the Tribe, the Reservation and the general public. They assist in day-to-day Tribal operations, public safety, Tribal family services, Native American assistance to needy families, cultural preservation, and Tribal environmental protection of natural resources, along with the monitoring of progress and needs of its Enterprises and the general public. The Tribe’s long term energy vision is to become self-sufficient and thereby attain greater control of its destiny, to control costs in view of rapidly rising electric utility expenses, and to maximize the use of renewable energy consistent with sustainable development practices. The project is a Renewable Energy System, specifically a ground mounted, fixed tilt, solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system with a rated capacity of 1.0MWac. The solar generated power serves the electric needs of the affected meters. It benefits every Tribal member since the cost of running the community Tribal facilities, including electric bills, comes out of the General Fund. The estimated 20 year project savings of $ 6,418,064 can be re-directed to other vital community needs, and the project will provide additional jobs for Tribal members. The project has been thoroughly researched and is ready to implement as soon as funding is approved.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians, San Jacinto, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians, San Jacinto, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE The Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (IE)
OSTI Identifier:
1419010
Report Number(s):
DOE-Soboba-2118
DOE Contract Number:  
IE0000040
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar energy; tribal energy; Tribe; Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians

Citation Formats

Estrada, Steven. Soboba Community Energy Solar Project - Phase 2. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1419010.
Estrada, Steven. Soboba Community Energy Solar Project - Phase 2. United States. doi:10.2172/1419010.
Estrada, Steven. Sun . "Soboba Community Energy Solar Project - Phase 2". United States. doi:10.2172/1419010. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1419010.
@article{osti_1419010,
title = {Soboba Community Energy Solar Project - Phase 2},
author = {Estrada, Steven},
abstractNote = {This is the final technical report for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians' second community solar project. Since time immemorial the descendants of the Soboba people are those whom have lived on and occupied the land that is presently known as the cities of San Jacinto, Hemet, Valle Vista and Winchester. On June 19, 1883, President Chester Arthur by Executive Order established the Soboba Indian Reservation, a 3,172-acre tract which included the Soboba village and the adjacent hills. The President had limited authority as he was only able to set aside public land for the establishment of a reservation and had no authority to take private land. Thus the Soboba village; cultivated lands and major springs were part of Rancho San Jacinto Viejo and belonged to Matthew Byrne. Today the Soboba Indian Reservation lies in the lower reaches of the San Jacinto Mountains, across the San Jacinto River from the city of San Jacinto. The Soboba Band of Luiseño Indians was awarded a community solar grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The incorporated cities of San Jacinto and Hemet, and the unincorporated community of Valle Vista border the Reservation. All three of these surrounding communities have experienced tremendous population growth over the past two decades, with slower growth during the recent economic downturn. The Tribal community that benefits from under this grant includes 1,161 enrolled members, the majority of which live on the reservation. Nearly 41% of the enrolled members are youth, age 18 and under. The elders and community leaders value preserving and maintaining the Luiseño and Cahuilla cultures and Tribal structure for future generations. The proposed project was administered from the Tribal Administration offices located on the reservation. The Soboba Tribal Government consists of five Tribal Members who are elected by the general membership to Tribal Council for a staggered two year term. The Chairman/Chairwoman is elected by a majority vote of the general membership but the positions for Vice-Chair, Tribal Secretary, Tribal Treasurer and Sergeant at Arms are decided by the elected council. The Soboba Tribal Administration encompasses several departments that serve the needs of the Tribe, the Reservation and the general public. They assist in day-to-day Tribal operations, public safety, Tribal family services, Native American assistance to needy families, cultural preservation, and Tribal environmental protection of natural resources, along with the monitoring of progress and needs of its Enterprises and the general public. The Tribe’s long term energy vision is to become self-sufficient and thereby attain greater control of its destiny, to control costs in view of rapidly rising electric utility expenses, and to maximize the use of renewable energy consistent with sustainable development practices. The project is a Renewable Energy System, specifically a ground mounted, fixed tilt, solar photovoltaic (PV) generating system with a rated capacity of 1.0MWac. The solar generated power serves the electric needs of the affected meters. It benefits every Tribal member since the cost of running the community Tribal facilities, including electric bills, comes out of the General Fund. The estimated 20 year project savings of $ 6,418,064 can be re-directed to other vital community needs, and the project will provide additional jobs for Tribal members. The project has been thoroughly researched and is ready to implement as soon as funding is approved.},
doi = {10.2172/1419010},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}