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Title: Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the International Space Station environmental surfaces

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health issue. In an effort to minimize this threat to astronauts, who may be immunocompromised and thus at a greater risk of infection from antimicrobial resistant pathogens, a comprehensive study of the ISS “resistome’ was conducted. Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) and disc diffusion antibiotic resistance assays, 9 biosafety level 2 organisms isolated from the ISS were assessed for their antibiotic resistance. Molecular analysis of AMR genes from 24 surface samples collected from the ISS during 3 different sampling events over a span of a year were analyzed with Ion AmpliSeq™ and metagenomics. Disc diffusion assays showed that Enterobacter bugandensis strains were resistant to all 9 antibiotics tested and Staphylococcus haemolyticus being resistant to none. Ion AmpliSeq™ revealed that 123 AMR genes were found, with those responsible for beta-lactam and trimethoprim resistance being the most abundant and widespread. Using a variety of methods, the genes involved in antimicrobial resistance have been examined for the first time from the ISS. Lastly, this information could lead to mitigation strategies to maintain astronaut health during long duration space missions when return to Earth for treatment is not possible.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)
  2. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  3. Naval Medical Research Center - Frederick, MD (United States)
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. Allosource, Centennial, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1418964
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-736498
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; resistome; antibiotic resistance; International Space Station; sequencing

Citation Formats

Urbaniak, C., Sielaff, A. Checinska, Frey, K. G., Allen, J. E., Singh, N., Jaing, C., Wheeler, K., and Venkateswaran, K. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the International Space Station environmental surfaces. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18506-4.
Urbaniak, C., Sielaff, A. Checinska, Frey, K. G., Allen, J. E., Singh, N., Jaing, C., Wheeler, K., & Venkateswaran, K. Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the International Space Station environmental surfaces. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18506-4.
Urbaniak, C., Sielaff, A. Checinska, Frey, K. G., Allen, J. E., Singh, N., Jaing, C., Wheeler, K., and Venkateswaran, K. Tue . "Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the International Space Station environmental surfaces". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18506-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418964.
@article{osti_1418964,
title = {Detection of antimicrobial resistance genes associated with the International Space Station environmental surfaces},
author = {Urbaniak, C. and Sielaff, A. Checinska and Frey, K. G. and Allen, J. E. and Singh, N. and Jaing, C. and Wheeler, K. and Venkateswaran, K.},
abstractNote = {Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health issue. In an effort to minimize this threat to astronauts, who may be immunocompromised and thus at a greater risk of infection from antimicrobial resistant pathogens, a comprehensive study of the ISS “resistome’ was conducted. Using whole genome sequencing (WGS) and disc diffusion antibiotic resistance assays, 9 biosafety level 2 organisms isolated from the ISS were assessed for their antibiotic resistance. Molecular analysis of AMR genes from 24 surface samples collected from the ISS during 3 different sampling events over a span of a year were analyzed with Ion AmpliSeq™ and metagenomics. Disc diffusion assays showed that Enterobacter bugandensis strains were resistant to all 9 antibiotics tested and Staphylococcus haemolyticus being resistant to none. Ion AmpliSeq™ revealed that 123 AMR genes were found, with those responsible for beta-lactam and trimethoprim resistance being the most abundant and widespread. Using a variety of methods, the genes involved in antimicrobial resistance have been examined for the first time from the ISS. Lastly, this information could lead to mitigation strategies to maintain astronaut health during long duration space missions when return to Earth for treatment is not possible.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-18506-4},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

A tale of three next generation sequencing platforms: comparison of Ion torrent, pacific biosciences and illumina MiSeq sequencers
journal, January 2012