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Title: Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95

Abstract

The development of an Image Matrix Processor (IMP) was proposed that would provide an economical means to perform rapid ray-tracing processes on volume "Giga Voxel" data sets. This was a multi-phased project. The objective of the first phase of the IMP project was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a workstation-based Image Matrix Processor for use in volumetric reconstruction and rendering using hardware simulation techniques. Additionally, ARACOR and LLNL worked together to identify and pursue further funding sources to complete a second phase of this project.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Advanced Research & Applications Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1418931
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-744847
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Roberson, G. Patrick, and Browne, Jolyon. Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1418931.
Roberson, G. Patrick, & Browne, Jolyon. Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95. United States. doi:10.2172/1418931.
Roberson, G. Patrick, and Browne, Jolyon. 2018. "Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95". United States. doi:10.2172/1418931. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418931.
@article{osti_1418931,
title = {Image Matrix Processor for Volumetric Computations Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1148-95},
author = {Roberson, G. Patrick and Browne, Jolyon},
abstractNote = {The development of an Image Matrix Processor (IMP) was proposed that would provide an economical means to perform rapid ray-tracing processes on volume "Giga Voxel" data sets. This was a multi-phased project. The objective of the first phase of the IMP project was to evaluate the practicality of implementing a workstation-based Image Matrix Processor for use in volumetric reconstruction and rendering using hardware simulation techniques. Additionally, ARACOR and LLNL worked together to identify and pursue further funding sources to complete a second phase of this project.},
doi = {10.2172/1418931},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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