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Title: Fracture Evolution in Multimineral Systems: The Role of Mineral Composition, Flow Rate, and Fracture Aperture Heterogeneity

Abstract

Geochemical reactions add complexity to the characterization and prediction of fracture hydraulic properties because they depend on factors that are highly heterogeneous, such as mineral composition. However, systematic analyses of fracture evolution in mineralogically heterogeneous systems are still limited. In this study, we investigated fracture evolution in multimineral systems using a reduced dimension reactive transport model. The model was developed and tested based on experimental studies and addresses the complex morphological and geochemical changes that arise from the presence of multiple minerals of different reactivities. Numerical experiments were performed using randomly generated initial fracture geometries based on representative geostatistics, different categories of mineral composition, and a range of flow rates that are relevant to geologic carbon storage systems. The simulation results showed distinct dissolution regimes at different flow rates, each of which produced characteristic dissolution patterns and temporal evolutions of chemical reactions and fracture hydraulic properties. Overall, as flow rate increases, fracture evolution shifts from compact dissolution to fracture channelization to uniform dissolution. The corresponding flow rate for a given dissolution regime, however, varies considerably with mineral composition. Fracture evolution, especially in the flow regime that induces fracture channelization, is also affected by initial fracture geometry. The numerical experiments weremore » used to develop a multireaction Damköhler number (mDa) for the prediction of fracture evolution, and fracture channelization in particular, in multimineral systems. The multireaction Damköhler number also provides a useful framework for the evaluation of caprock integrity in geologic carbon storage systems.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1418895
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1476626
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
ACS Earth and Space Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2472-3452
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; caprock integrity; fracture evolution; geologic carbon storage; mineral heterogeneity; multireaction Damköhler number; reactive transport model

Citation Formats

Deng, Hang, Steefel, Carl, Molins, Sergi, and DePaolo, Donald. Fracture Evolution in Multimineral Systems: The Role of Mineral Composition, Flow Rate, and Fracture Aperture Heterogeneity. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00130.
Deng, Hang, Steefel, Carl, Molins, Sergi, & DePaolo, Donald. Fracture Evolution in Multimineral Systems: The Role of Mineral Composition, Flow Rate, and Fracture Aperture Heterogeneity. United States. doi:10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00130.
Deng, Hang, Steefel, Carl, Molins, Sergi, and DePaolo, Donald. Fri . "Fracture Evolution in Multimineral Systems: The Role of Mineral Composition, Flow Rate, and Fracture Aperture Heterogeneity". United States. doi:10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00130.
@article{osti_1418895,
title = {Fracture Evolution in Multimineral Systems: The Role of Mineral Composition, Flow Rate, and Fracture Aperture Heterogeneity},
author = {Deng, Hang and Steefel, Carl and Molins, Sergi and DePaolo, Donald},
abstractNote = {Geochemical reactions add complexity to the characterization and prediction of fracture hydraulic properties because they depend on factors that are highly heterogeneous, such as mineral composition. However, systematic analyses of fracture evolution in mineralogically heterogeneous systems are still limited. In this study, we investigated fracture evolution in multimineral systems using a reduced dimension reactive transport model. The model was developed and tested based on experimental studies and addresses the complex morphological and geochemical changes that arise from the presence of multiple minerals of different reactivities. Numerical experiments were performed using randomly generated initial fracture geometries based on representative geostatistics, different categories of mineral composition, and a range of flow rates that are relevant to geologic carbon storage systems. The simulation results showed distinct dissolution regimes at different flow rates, each of which produced characteristic dissolution patterns and temporal evolutions of chemical reactions and fracture hydraulic properties. Overall, as flow rate increases, fracture evolution shifts from compact dissolution to fracture channelization to uniform dissolution. The corresponding flow rate for a given dissolution regime, however, varies considerably with mineral composition. Fracture evolution, especially in the flow regime that induces fracture channelization, is also affected by initial fracture geometry. The numerical experiments were used to develop a multireaction Damköhler number (mDa) for the prediction of fracture evolution, and fracture channelization in particular, in multimineral systems. The multireaction Damköhler number also provides a useful framework for the evaluation of caprock integrity in geologic carbon storage systems.},
doi = {10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00130},
journal = {ACS Earth and Space Chemistry},
number = 2,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acsearthspacechem.7b00130

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Cited by: 2 works
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