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Title: AmeriFlux US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.

Abstract

This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.. Site Description - Tundra permafrost degrading

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Northern Arizona
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
AmeriFlux; University of Northern Arizona
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE, LTER, US-National Park Service
OSTI Identifier:
1418678
Resource Type:
Data
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Belshe, E. F., Schuur, E. A., Bolker, B. M., Bracho, R. (2012) Incorporating Spatial Heterogeneity Created By Permafrost Thaw Into A Landscape Carbon Estimate, Journal Of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, 117(G1), n/a-n/a
Data Type:
Specialized Mix
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Schuur, Ted. AmeriFlux US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.17190/AMF/1418678.
Schuur, Ted. AmeriFlux US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.. United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1418678.
Schuur, Ted. 2018. "AmeriFlux US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.". United States. doi:10.17190/AMF/1418678. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418678.
@article{osti_1418678,
title = {AmeriFlux US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.},
author = {Schuur, Ted},
abstractNote = {This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-EML Eight Mile Lake Permafrost thaw gradient, Healy Alaska.. Site Description - Tundra permafrost degrading},
doi = {10.17190/AMF/1418678},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Dataset:

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  • FLIR thermal infrared (TIR), digital camera photos, and plot notes across the Barrow, Alaska DTLB site. Data were collected together with measurements of canopy spectral reflectance (see associated metadata record (NGEE Arctic HR1024i Canopy Spectral Reflectance, Drained Thaw Lake Basin, Barrow, Alaska, July 2015 ). Data contained within this archive include exported FLIR images (analyzed with FLIR-Tools), digital photos, TIR report, and sample notes. Further TIR image analysis can be conducted in FLIR-Tools.
  • This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication available at doi:10.5194/tc-10-341-2016. This dataset contains an ensemble of thermal-hydro soil parameters including porosity, thermal conductivity, thermal conductivity shape parameters, and residual saturation of peat and mineral soil. The ensemble was generated using a Null-Space Monte Carlo analysis of parameter uncertainty based on a calibration to soil temperatures collected at the Barrow Environmental Observatory site by the NGEE team. The micro-topography of ice wedge polygons present at the site is included in the analysis using three 1D column models to represent polygon center, rim and trough features. The Arcticmore » Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used in the calibration to model multiphase thermal and hydrological processes in the subsurface.« less
  • Geophysical properties of saline permafrost core from site 0 transect at 260-280cm below ground surface.
  • Permafrost stores approximately 50% of global soil carbon (C) in a frozen form; it is thawing rapidly under climate change, and little is known about viral communities in these soils or their roles in C cycling. In permafrost soils, microorganisms contribute significantly to C cycling, and characterizing them has recently been shown to improve prediction of ecosystem function. In other ecosystems, viruses have broad ecosystem and community impacts ranging from host cell mortality and organic matter cycling to horizontal gene transfer and reprogramming of core microbial metabolisms. Here we developed an optimized protocol to extract viruses from three types ofmore » high organic-matter peatland soils across a permafrost thaw gradient (palsa, moss-dominated bog, and sedge-dominated fen). Three separate experiments were used to evaluate the impact of chemical buffers, physical dispersion, storage conditions, and concentration and purification methods on viral yields. The most successful protocol, amended potassium citrate buffer with bead-beating or vortexing and BSA, yielded on average as much as 2-fold more virus-like particles (VLPs) g –1of soil than other methods tested. All method combinations yielded VLPs g –1of soil on the 10 8order of magnitude across all three soil types. The different storage and concentration methods did not yield significantly more VLPs g –1of soil among the soil types. In conclusion, this research provides much-needed guidelines for resuspending viruses from soils, specifically carbon-rich soils, paving the way for incorporating viruses into soil ecology studies.« less