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Title: Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation

Abstract

This paper describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1418467
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1525-2027
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; physical properties of rocks; structural geology; tectonophysics; hydrology; helium release; shale deformation

Citation Formats

Bauer, Stephen J., Gardner, W. Payton, and Heath, Jason E.. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016GC006352.
Bauer, Stephen J., Gardner, W. Payton, & Heath, Jason E.. Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GC006352.
Bauer, Stephen J., Gardner, W. Payton, and Heath, Jason E.. 2016. "Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GC006352. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418467.
@article{osti_1418467,
title = {Helium release during shale deformation: Experimental validation},
author = {Bauer, Stephen J. and Gardner, W. Payton and Heath, Jason E.},
abstractNote = {This paper describes initial experimental results of helium tracer release monitoring during deformation of shale. Naturally occurring radiogenic 4He is present in high concentration in most shales. During rock deformation, accumulated helium could be released as fractures are created and new transport pathways are created. We present the results of an experimental study in which confined reservoir shale samples, cored parallel and perpendicular to bedding, which were initially saturated with helium to simulate reservoir conditions, are subjected to triaxial compressive deformation. During the deformation experiment, differential stress, axial, and radial strains are systematically tracked. Release of helium is dynamically measured using a helium mass spectrometer leak detector. Helium released during deformation is observable at the laboratory scale and the release is tightly coupled to the shale deformation. These first measurements of dynamic helium release from rocks undergoing deformation show that helium provides information on the evolution of microstructure as a function of changes in stress and strain.},
doi = {10.1002/2016GC006352},
journal = {Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems},
number = 7,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
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