skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework

Abstract

Here, in 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1418457
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-16-761-CD
Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6588; 1638151
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physics. Conference Series
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 898; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1742-6588
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Sexton-Kennedy, E., Gartung, P., and Jones, C. D. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/898/4/042045.
Sexton-Kennedy, E., Gartung, P., & Jones, C. D. Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework. United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/898/4/042045.
Sexton-Kennedy, E., Gartung, P., and Jones, C. D. 2017. "Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework". United States. doi:10.1088/1742-6596/898/4/042045. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418457.
@article{osti_1418457,
title = {Benchmarking high performance computing architectures with CMS’ skeleton framework},
author = {Sexton-Kennedy, E. and Gartung, P. and Jones, C. D.},
abstractNote = {Here, in 2012 CMS evaluated which underlying concurrency technology would be the best to use for its multi-threaded framework. The available technologies were evaluated on the high throughput computing systems dominating the resources in use at that time. A skeleton framework benchmarking suite that emulates the tasks performed within a CMSSW application was used to select Intel’s Thread Building Block library, based on the measured overheads in both memory and CPU on the different technologies benchmarked. In 2016 CMS will get access to high performance computing resources that use new many core architectures; machines such as Cori Phase 1&2, Theta, Mira. Because of this we have revived the 2012 benchmark to test it’s performance and conclusions on these new architectures. This talk will discuss the results of this exercise.},
doi = {10.1088/1742-6596/898/4/042045},
journal = {Journal of Physics. Conference Series},
number = 4,
volume = 898,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • Legacy codes remain a crucial element of today's simulation-based engineering ecosystem due to the extensive validation process and investment in such software. The rapid evolution of high-performance computing architectures necessitates the modernization of these codes. One approach to modernization is a complete overhaul of the code. However, this could require extensive investments, such as rewriting in modern languages, new data constructs, etc., which will necessitate systematic verification and validation to re-establish the credibility of the computational models. The current study advocates using a more incremental approach and is a culmination of several modernization efforts of the legacy code MFIX, whichmore » is an open-source computational fluid dynamics code that has evolved over several decades, widely used in multiphase flows and still being developed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Two different modernization approaches,‘bottom-up’ and ‘top-down’, are illustrated. Here, preliminary results show up to 8.5x improvement at the selected kernel level with the first approach, and up to 50% improvement in total simulated time with the latter were achieved for the demonstration cases and target HPC systems employed.« less
  • In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strongmore » element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.« less
  • This paper describes the GridPACK™ framework, which is designed to help power grid engineers develop modeling software capable of running on high performance computers. The framework makes extensive use of software templates to provide high level functionality while at the same time allowing developers the freedom to express whatever models and algorithms they are using. GridPACK™ contains modules for setting up distributed power grid networks, assigning buses and branches with arbitrary behaviors to the network, creating distributed matrices and vectors and using parallel linear and non-linear solvers to solve algebraic equations. It also provides mappers to create matrices and vectorsmore » based on properties of the network and functionality to support IO and to mana« less
  • This paper describes the GridPACK™ software framework for developing power grid simulations that can run on high performance computing platforms, with several example applications (dynamic simulation, static contingency analysis, and dynamic contingency analysis) that have been developed using GridPACK.