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Title: An Investigation of LED Street Lighting's Impact on Sky Glow

Abstract

A significant amount of public attention has recently focused on perceived impacts of converting street lighting from incumbent lamp-based products to LED technology. Much of this attention pertains to the higher content of short wavelength light (commonly referred to as "blue light") of LEDs and its attendant influences on sky glow (a brightening of the night sky that can interfere with astronomical observation and may be associated with a host of other issues). The complexity of this topic leads to common misunderstandings and misperceptions among the public, and for this reason the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Program embarked on a study of sky glow using a well-established astronomical model to investigate some of the primary factors influencing sky glow. This report details the results of the investigation and attempts to present those results in terms accessible to the general lighting community. The report also strives to put the results into a larger context, and help educate interested readers on various topics relevant to the issues being discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1418092
Report Number(s):
PNNL-26411
BT0301000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; blue light; LED Street Lighting; Solid State Lighting; Sky Glow

Citation Formats

Kinzey, Bruce R., Perrin, Tess E., Miller, Naomi J., Kocifaj, Miroslav, Aube, Martin, and Lamphar, Hector A. An Investigation of LED Street Lighting's Impact on Sky Glow. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1418092.
Kinzey, Bruce R., Perrin, Tess E., Miller, Naomi J., Kocifaj, Miroslav, Aube, Martin, & Lamphar, Hector A. An Investigation of LED Street Lighting's Impact on Sky Glow. United States. doi:10.2172/1418092.
Kinzey, Bruce R., Perrin, Tess E., Miller, Naomi J., Kocifaj, Miroslav, Aube, Martin, and Lamphar, Hector A. Tue . "An Investigation of LED Street Lighting's Impact on Sky Glow". United States. doi:10.2172/1418092. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1418092.
@article{osti_1418092,
title = {An Investigation of LED Street Lighting's Impact on Sky Glow},
author = {Kinzey, Bruce R. and Perrin, Tess E. and Miller, Naomi J. and Kocifaj, Miroslav and Aube, Martin and Lamphar, Hector A.},
abstractNote = {A significant amount of public attention has recently focused on perceived impacts of converting street lighting from incumbent lamp-based products to LED technology. Much of this attention pertains to the higher content of short wavelength light (commonly referred to as "blue light") of LEDs and its attendant influences on sky glow (a brightening of the night sky that can interfere with astronomical observation and may be associated with a host of other issues). The complexity of this topic leads to common misunderstandings and misperceptions among the public, and for this reason the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Program embarked on a study of sky glow using a well-established astronomical model to investigate some of the primary factors influencing sky glow. This report details the results of the investigation and attempts to present those results in terms accessible to the general lighting community. The report also strives to put the results into a larger context, and help educate interested readers on various topics relevant to the issues being discussed.},
doi = {10.2172/1418092},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 25 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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