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Title: High Efficiency Turbine Generator for Instream Electric Power Production

Abstract

Concerns over global warming due to carbon emissions have spurred an interest in such renewable energy alternatives as hydroelectric, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass. Of all of these, hydroelectric power offers perhaps the greatest potential for supplying a significant portion of our nation's energy needs. To realize this potential, however, this technology needs to expand beyond traditional dam based installations (for which there are relatively few suitable remaining sites) into the vast number of open flow installations potentially available in rivers, canals, tidal streams and open ocean sites. To help promote this expansion, this project focused on the development of an advanced, vertical axis, hydrokinetic power generator (HPG) technology for open flow applications. Two key features investigated for this were (1) an active blade pitch control system that provides independent control of the turbine blades, and (2) a low-profile, low-speed, high-torque electric generator suitable for direct coupling to the turbine (no gearbox). Both systems are based on a unique, disk-shape, high performance electromechanical design that is potentially low cost, compact, light-weight, and efficient. Blade actuator and generator designs were developed and optimized for this application. They were then incorporated into several HPG designs based on an optimized H-Darrieus turbine structuremore » that was also developed. Three HPG sizes were explored (10kW, 25kW and 50kW) to assess scalability. For each size, two HPG versions were developed: one with the electric generator mounted above the turbine and one with it integrated into the turbine body. Each provided certain benefits and illustrated the versatility of this technology. Design and performance specifications were calculated and comparisons were made with commercial hydrokinetic turbine products. Based on these comparisons, this technology was smaller and significantly lighter (by up to 50%) in the higher power ratings. A preliminary cost analysis was performed for these designs. Costs were determined in prototyping (1-10), small (100), and medium (1000) production volumes. Installed costs were then estimated and compared to wind and solar energy products of similar rating. Based on that comparison, the installed cost of this technology is expected to be similar in small production volumes and lower in medium (or greater) production volumes. Finally, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was calculated for the 50kW HPG and compared to other renewables (solar, wind, small and large scale hydro) based on published data. The LCOE estimated for this system ($31/MWh-48/MWh dollars) was found to be quite competitive with other renewables, especially if higher production volumes can be achieved. Based on these findings, this technology should be successful if commercialized and promote the expansion of river-based power generation.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Magnetic Power-Motion, LLC, Floyds Knobs, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Magnetic Power-Motion, LLC, Floyds Knobs, IN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1418019
Report Number(s):
DOE-15828
DOE Contract Number:
SC0015828
Type / Phase:
SBIR (Phase I)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; hydroelectric; hydroturbine; hydropower; electric; generator; actuator; Darrieus; turbine; blade

Citation Formats

Kelecy, Patrick M. High Efficiency Turbine Generator for Instream Electric Power Production. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Kelecy, Patrick M. High Efficiency Turbine Generator for Instream Electric Power Production. United States.
Kelecy, Patrick M. Sat . "High Efficiency Turbine Generator for Instream Electric Power Production". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1418019,
title = {High Efficiency Turbine Generator for Instream Electric Power Production},
author = {Kelecy, Patrick M.},
abstractNote = {Concerns over global warming due to carbon emissions have spurred an interest in such renewable energy alternatives as hydroelectric, wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass. Of all of these, hydroelectric power offers perhaps the greatest potential for supplying a significant portion of our nation's energy needs. To realize this potential, however, this technology needs to expand beyond traditional dam based installations (for which there are relatively few suitable remaining sites) into the vast number of open flow installations potentially available in rivers, canals, tidal streams and open ocean sites. To help promote this expansion, this project focused on the development of an advanced, vertical axis, hydrokinetic power generator (HPG) technology for open flow applications. Two key features investigated for this were (1) an active blade pitch control system that provides independent control of the turbine blades, and (2) a low-profile, low-speed, high-torque electric generator suitable for direct coupling to the turbine (no gearbox). Both systems are based on a unique, disk-shape, high performance electromechanical design that is potentially low cost, compact, light-weight, and efficient. Blade actuator and generator designs were developed and optimized for this application. They were then incorporated into several HPG designs based on an optimized H-Darrieus turbine structure that was also developed. Three HPG sizes were explored (10kW, 25kW and 50kW) to assess scalability. For each size, two HPG versions were developed: one with the electric generator mounted above the turbine and one with it integrated into the turbine body. Each provided certain benefits and illustrated the versatility of this technology. Design and performance specifications were calculated and comparisons were made with commercial hydrokinetic turbine products. Based on these comparisons, this technology was smaller and significantly lighter (by up to 50%) in the higher power ratings. A preliminary cost analysis was performed for these designs. Costs were determined in prototyping (1-10), small (100), and medium (1000) production volumes. Installed costs were then estimated and compared to wind and solar energy products of similar rating. Based on that comparison, the installed cost of this technology is expected to be similar in small production volumes and lower in medium (or greater) production volumes. Finally, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was calculated for the 50kW HPG and compared to other renewables (solar, wind, small and large scale hydro) based on published data. The LCOE estimated for this system ($31/MWh-48/MWh dollars) was found to be quite competitive with other renewables, especially if higher production volumes can be achieved. Based on these findings, this technology should be successful if commercialized and promote the expansion of river-based power generation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as January 25, 2022
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