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Title: Benefits of Hot Isostatic Pressure/Powdered Metal (HIP/PM) and Additive Manufacturing (AM) To Fabricate Advanced Energy System Components

Abstract

Advanced Energy systems require large, complex components produced from materials capable of withstanding severe operating environments (high temperature, pressure, corrosivity). Such parts can be difficult to source, as conventional material processing technologies must be tailored to ensure a safe and cost effective approach to large-scale manufacture of quality structural advanced alloy components that meet the performance specifications of AE systems. (HIP/PM) has shown advantages over other manufacturing methods when working with these materials. For example, using HIP’ing in lieu of casting means significant savings in raw material costs, which for expensive, high-nickel alloys can be considerable for large-scale production. Use of HIP/PM also eliminates the difficulties resulting from reactivity of these materials in the molten state and facilitates manufacture of the large size requirements of the AE industry, producing a part that is defect and porosity free, thus further reducing or eliminating time and expense of post processing machining and weld repair. New advances in Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques make it possible to further expand the benefits of HIP/PM in producing AE system components to create an even more robust manufacturing approach. Traditional techniques of welding and forming sheet metal to produce the HIP canisters can be time consuming andmore » costly, with limitations on the complexity of part which can be achieved. A key benefit of AM is the freedom of design that it offers, so use of AM could overcome such challenges, ultimately enabling redesign of complete energy systems. A critical step toward this goal is material characterization of the required advanced alloys, for use in AM. Using Haynes 282, a high nickel alloy of interest to the Fossil Energy community, particularly for Advanced-UltraSuperCritical (AUSC) operating environments, as well as the crosscutting interests of the aerospace, defense and medical markets, this research pursued three new methods of manufacturing these advanced alloys: 1) Directly built AM parts; 2) AM cans for HIP/PM; and 3) AM cans produced in the final part material. The project utilized Carpenter atomized A-282 in varied mesh sizes customized for both AM and HIP, ExOne’s binderjet technology, the fastest metal 3D printing technique on the market at the current time, coupled with an alloy specific sintering profile to produce a sufficiently dense part for final HIP by Bodycote. Final parts were subjected to chemical and physical property tests and results were compared to published and gathered data. Chemistry results for all the parts were within the published criteria. Furthermore, the AM and HIP/PM parts showed measurable improvement over previous A282 HIP/PM results, in part due to an improved HT spec, and a marked improvement over results from A282 castings. These results indicate that combining AM and HIP/PM in the manner set forth in this project provides a credible manufacturing approach of these activities are set forth in this Final Technical Report.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Energy Industries of Ohio, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Industries of Ohio, Cleveland, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
ExOne; Bodycote; Carpenter Powder Products, Inc.
OSTI Identifier:
1417877
Report Number(s):
DOEEIO24014
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0024014
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; Additive manufacturing; AM; hot isostatic pressure of powdered metal; HIP/PM; advanced energy systems; Haynes 282; A-282; high nickel alloy; 3D printing

Citation Formats

Horton, Nancy, and Sheppard, Roy. Benefits of Hot Isostatic Pressure/Powdered Metal (HIP/PM) and Additive Manufacturing (AM) To Fabricate Advanced Energy System Components. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1417877.
Horton, Nancy, & Sheppard, Roy. Benefits of Hot Isostatic Pressure/Powdered Metal (HIP/PM) and Additive Manufacturing (AM) To Fabricate Advanced Energy System Components. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1417877
Horton, Nancy, and Sheppard, Roy. 2016. "Benefits of Hot Isostatic Pressure/Powdered Metal (HIP/PM) and Additive Manufacturing (AM) To Fabricate Advanced Energy System Components". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1417877. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417877.
@article{osti_1417877,
title = {Benefits of Hot Isostatic Pressure/Powdered Metal (HIP/PM) and Additive Manufacturing (AM) To Fabricate Advanced Energy System Components},
author = {Horton, Nancy and Sheppard, Roy},
abstractNote = {Advanced Energy systems require large, complex components produced from materials capable of withstanding severe operating environments (high temperature, pressure, corrosivity). Such parts can be difficult to source, as conventional material processing technologies must be tailored to ensure a safe and cost effective approach to large-scale manufacture of quality structural advanced alloy components that meet the performance specifications of AE systems. (HIP/PM) has shown advantages over other manufacturing methods when working with these materials. For example, using HIP’ing in lieu of casting means significant savings in raw material costs, which for expensive, high-nickel alloys can be considerable for large-scale production. Use of HIP/PM also eliminates the difficulties resulting from reactivity of these materials in the molten state and facilitates manufacture of the large size requirements of the AE industry, producing a part that is defect and porosity free, thus further reducing or eliminating time and expense of post processing machining and weld repair. New advances in Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques make it possible to further expand the benefits of HIP/PM in producing AE system components to create an even more robust manufacturing approach. Traditional techniques of welding and forming sheet metal to produce the HIP canisters can be time consuming and costly, with limitations on the complexity of part which can be achieved. A key benefit of AM is the freedom of design that it offers, so use of AM could overcome such challenges, ultimately enabling redesign of complete energy systems. A critical step toward this goal is material characterization of the required advanced alloys, for use in AM. Using Haynes 282, a high nickel alloy of interest to the Fossil Energy community, particularly for Advanced-UltraSuperCritical (AUSC) operating environments, as well as the crosscutting interests of the aerospace, defense and medical markets, this research pursued three new methods of manufacturing these advanced alloys: 1) Directly built AM parts; 2) AM cans for HIP/PM; and 3) AM cans produced in the final part material. The project utilized Carpenter atomized A-282 in varied mesh sizes customized for both AM and HIP, ExOne’s binderjet technology, the fastest metal 3D printing technique on the market at the current time, coupled with an alloy specific sintering profile to produce a sufficiently dense part for final HIP by Bodycote. Final parts were subjected to chemical and physical property tests and results were compared to published and gathered data. Chemistry results for all the parts were within the published criteria. Furthermore, the AM and HIP/PM parts showed measurable improvement over previous A282 HIP/PM results, in part due to an improved HT spec, and a marked improvement over results from A282 castings. These results indicate that combining AM and HIP/PM in the manner set forth in this project provides a credible manufacturing approach of these activities are set forth in this Final Technical Report.},
doi = {10.2172/1417877},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1417877}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {12}
}