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Title: Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water

Abstract

Designing materials to function in harsh environments, such as conductive aqueous media, is a problem of broad interest to a range of technologies, including energy, ocean monitoring and biological applications. The main challenge is to retain the stability and morphology of the material as it interacts dynamically with the surrounding environment. Materials that respond to mild stimuli through collective phase transitions and amplify signals could open up new avenues for sensing. Here we present the discovery of an electric-field-driven, water-mediated reversible phase change in a perovskite-structured nickelate, SmNiO 3. This prototypical strongly correlated quantum material is stable in salt water, does not corrode, and allows exchange of protons with the surrounding water at ambient temperature, with the concurrent modification in electrical resistance and optical properties being capable of multi-modal readout. Besides operating both as thermistors and pH sensors, devices made of this material can detect sub-volt electric potentials in salt water. Finally, we postulate that such devices could be used in oceanic environments for monitoring electrical signals from various maritime vessels and sea creatures

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [1];  [1];  [9];  [8];  [6];  [3];  [2] more »;  [1] « less
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Materials Engineering
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials
  3. Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  4. National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). NIST Center for Neutron Research
  5. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS). X-ray Science Division
  6. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  7. Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Canadian Light Source
  8. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics
  9. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); US Army Research Office (ARO); National Science Foundation (NSF); Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA); US Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR); US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR)
OSTI Identifier:
1417841
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357; AC02-05CH11231; D15AP00111; FA9550-16-1-0159; FA9550-14-1-0389; N00014-16-1-2442; N00014-12-1040
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature (London)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nature (London); Journal Volume: 553; Journal Issue: 7686; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-0836
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Zhang, Zhen, Schwanz, Derek, Narayanan, Badri, Kotiuga, Michele, Dura, Joseph A., Cherukara, Mathew, Zhou, Hua, Freeland, John W., Li, Jiarui, Sutarto, Ronny, He, Feizhou, Wu, Chongzhao, Zhu, Jiaxin, Sun, Yifei, Ramadoss, Koushik, Nonnenmann, Stephen S., Yu, Nanfang, Comin, Riccardo, Rabe, Karin M., Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S., and Ramanathan, Shriram. Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/nature25008.
Zhang, Zhen, Schwanz, Derek, Narayanan, Badri, Kotiuga, Michele, Dura, Joseph A., Cherukara, Mathew, Zhou, Hua, Freeland, John W., Li, Jiarui, Sutarto, Ronny, He, Feizhou, Wu, Chongzhao, Zhu, Jiaxin, Sun, Yifei, Ramadoss, Koushik, Nonnenmann, Stephen S., Yu, Nanfang, Comin, Riccardo, Rabe, Karin M., Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S., & Ramanathan, Shriram. Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water. United States. doi:10.1038/nature25008.
Zhang, Zhen, Schwanz, Derek, Narayanan, Badri, Kotiuga, Michele, Dura, Joseph A., Cherukara, Mathew, Zhou, Hua, Freeland, John W., Li, Jiarui, Sutarto, Ronny, He, Feizhou, Wu, Chongzhao, Zhu, Jiaxin, Sun, Yifei, Ramadoss, Koushik, Nonnenmann, Stephen S., Yu, Nanfang, Comin, Riccardo, Rabe, Karin M., Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S., and Ramanathan, Shriram. Mon . "Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water". United States. doi:10.1038/nature25008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417841.
@article{osti_1417841,
title = {Perovskite nickelates as electric-field sensors in salt water},
author = {Zhang, Zhen and Schwanz, Derek and Narayanan, Badri and Kotiuga, Michele and Dura, Joseph A. and Cherukara, Mathew and Zhou, Hua and Freeland, John W. and Li, Jiarui and Sutarto, Ronny and He, Feizhou and Wu, Chongzhao and Zhu, Jiaxin and Sun, Yifei and Ramadoss, Koushik and Nonnenmann, Stephen S. and Yu, Nanfang and Comin, Riccardo and Rabe, Karin M. and Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S. and Ramanathan, Shriram},
abstractNote = {Designing materials to function in harsh environments, such as conductive aqueous media, is a problem of broad interest to a range of technologies, including energy, ocean monitoring and biological applications. The main challenge is to retain the stability and morphology of the material as it interacts dynamically with the surrounding environment. Materials that respond to mild stimuli through collective phase transitions and amplify signals could open up new avenues for sensing. Here we present the discovery of an electric-field-driven, water-mediated reversible phase change in a perovskite-structured nickelate, SmNiO3. This prototypical strongly correlated quantum material is stable in salt water, does not corrode, and allows exchange of protons with the surrounding water at ambient temperature, with the concurrent modification in electrical resistance and optical properties being capable of multi-modal readout. Besides operating both as thermistors and pH sensors, devices made of this material can detect sub-volt electric potentials in salt water. Finally, we postulate that such devices could be used in oceanic environments for monitoring electrical signals from various maritime vessels and sea creatures},
doi = {10.1038/nature25008},
journal = {Nature (London)},
number = 7686,
volume = 553,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Dec 18 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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