skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: U 3Si 2 behavior in H 2O: Part I, flowing steam and the effect of hydrogen

Abstract

Recent interest in U 3Si 2 as an advanced light water reactor fuel has driven assessment of numerous properties, but characterization of its response to H 2O environments is absent from the literature. The behavior of U 3Si 2 in H 2O containing atmospheres is investigated and presented in a two-part series of articles aimed to understand the degradation mechanism of U 3Si 2 in H 2O. Reported here are thermogravimetric data for U 3Si 2 exposed to flowing steam at 250–470 °C. Additionally the response of U 3Si 2 to flowing Ar-6% H 2 from 350 to 400 °C is presented. Microstructural degradation is observed following hours of exposure at 350 °C in steam. U 3Si 2 undergoes pulverization on the timescale of minutes when temperatures are increased above 400 °C. In conclusion, this mechanism is accelerated in flowing Ar-H 2 at the same temperatures.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1417827
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-30039
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Nuclear Materials; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; Material Science

Citation Formats

Wood, Elizabeth Sooby, White, Joshua Taylor, Grote, Christopher John, and Nelson, Andrew Thomas. U3Si2 behavior in H2O: Part I, flowing steam and the effect of hydrogen. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.002.
Wood, Elizabeth Sooby, White, Joshua Taylor, Grote, Christopher John, & Nelson, Andrew Thomas. U3Si2 behavior in H2O: Part I, flowing steam and the effect of hydrogen. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.002.
Wood, Elizabeth Sooby, White, Joshua Taylor, Grote, Christopher John, and Nelson, Andrew Thomas. 2018. "U3Si2 behavior in H2O: Part I, flowing steam and the effect of hydrogen". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.002.
@article{osti_1417827,
title = {U3Si2 behavior in H2O: Part I, flowing steam and the effect of hydrogen},
author = {Wood, Elizabeth Sooby and White, Joshua Taylor and Grote, Christopher John and Nelson, Andrew Thomas},
abstractNote = {Recent interest in U3Si2 as an advanced light water reactor fuel has driven assessment of numerous properties, but characterization of its response to H2O environments is absent from the literature. The behavior of U3Si2 in H2O containing atmospheres is investigated and presented in a two-part series of articles aimed to understand the degradation mechanism of U3Si2 in H2O. Reported here are thermogravimetric data for U3Si2 exposed to flowing steam at 250–470 °C. Additionally the response of U3Si2 to flowing Ar-6% H2 from 350 to 400 °C is presented. Microstructural degradation is observed following hours of exposure at 350 °C in steam. U3Si2 undergoes pulverization on the timescale of minutes when temperatures are increased above 400 °C. In conclusion, this mechanism is accelerated in flowing Ar-H2 at the same temperatures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2018.01.002},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 17, 2019
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • Laboratory measurements of the effects of steam injection on the electrical conductivity of sands can aid in the interpretation of electrical surveys used to monitor subsurface steam-injection projects. The effect of variations in injected steam quality was measured in the experiments presented here. The injection of low-quality steam, boiled from a 0.01 mol/L NaCl solution, into clean sand saturated with 0.01 mol/L NaCl, resulted in a new decrease in conductivity and a constant equilibrium conductivity in the steam zone. The injection of high-quality steam, using the same saturating and injection salinities, caused the conductivity to first drop to a minimummore » and then to increase to an equilibrium value similar to the seen in the low-quality injection. The local conductivity minimum deepened with time and traveled with the steam front. The appearance of the conductivity minimum at the steam front can be attributed to the formation of dilution bank, which temporarily decreases the local salinity. The extent of the dilution increases with time, resulting in the decrease of the conductivity over time. The conductivity then increases as injected salt moves through the sand. The steam quality controls the appearance of this minimum because it determines the relative speeds of the steam front and the steam liquid: a minimum will not occur if the steam front moves more slowly than the steam liquid.« less
  • Computer simulation models of the flow and heat transfer in power station steam condensers have the potential for becoming important design tools. These computer models may be used to improve existing designs by identifying ways to improve condenser vacuum and to minimize flow induced tube vibration. To date, such models seem to have experienced convergence problems, or require information to be specified that would not normally be known a priori. This article describes components of a finite-volume model that is through to by typical of those used by several investigators. The convergence characteristics of this model are described when itmore » is applied to two problems. This model, and its convergence characteristics, provide a baseline against which improvements can be measured. The impact of various improvements to this model are reported in a companion article.« less