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Title: Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations"

Abstract

The report describes hypotheses, aims, methods and results of the project 20170675PRD2, “Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations”, which has been run from July 31, 2017 to January 7, 2018. The technical work has been performed by Director’s Fellow Davide Girolami of the T-4 Division, Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, under the supervision of Wojciech Zurek (T-4), Lukasz Cincio (T-4), and Marcus Daniels (CCS-7). The project ended as Davide Girolami has been converted to J. R. Oppenheimer Fellow to work on the project 20180702PRD1, “Optimal Control of Quantum Machines”, started on January 8, 2018.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1417804
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-20317
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Mathematics

Citation Formats

Girolami, Davide. Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations". United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1417804.
Girolami, Davide. Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations". United States. doi:10.2172/1417804.
Girolami, Davide. 2018. "Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations"". United States. doi:10.2172/1417804. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417804.
@article{osti_1417804,
title = {Final Technical Report of the project "Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations"},
author = {Girolami, Davide},
abstractNote = {The report describes hypotheses, aims, methods and results of the project 20170675PRD2, “Controlling Quantum Information by Quantum Correlations”, which has been run from July 31, 2017 to January 7, 2018. The technical work has been performed by Director’s Fellow Davide Girolami of the T-4 Division, Physics of Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, under the supervision of Wojciech Zurek (T-4), Lukasz Cincio (T-4), and Marcus Daniels (CCS-7). The project ended as Davide Girolami has been converted to J. R. Oppenheimer Fellow to work on the project 20180702PRD1, “Optimal Control of Quantum Machines”, started on January 8, 2018.},
doi = {10.2172/1417804},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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