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Title: Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest

Abstract

Decomposition and transformation of organic matter (OM) in forest soils are conducted by the concomitant action of saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we examine chemical changes in OM after fungal colonization in nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized soils from a Norway spruce forest. Sand-filled bags amended with composted maize leaves were placed in the forest soil and harvested after 17 months. Infrared and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies were used to study the chemical changes in the OM. Fungal community composition of the bags was also evaluated. The proportion of ectomycorrhizal fungi declined in the fertilized plots, but the overall fungal community composition was similar between N treatments. Decomposition of the OM was, independently of the N level or soil horizon, accompanied by an increase of C/N ratio of the mesh-bag content. Furthermore, the proportions of carboxylic compounds in the incubated OM increased in the mineral horizon, while heterocyclic-N compounds decreased, especially in unfertilized plots with higher N demand from the trees.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1417665
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Plant and Soil
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 419; Journal Issue: 1-2; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-079X
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Fungal community composition; Infrared spectroscopy; Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy; Nitrogen fertilization; Norway spruce forest; Organic matter decomposition

Citation Formats

Nicolas, Cesar, Almeida, Juan P., Ellstrom, Magnus, Bahr, Adam, Bone, Sharon E., Rosenstock, Nicholas P., Bargar, John R., Tunlid, Anders, Persson, Per, and Wallander, Hakan. Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3324-8.
Nicolas, Cesar, Almeida, Juan P., Ellstrom, Magnus, Bahr, Adam, Bone, Sharon E., Rosenstock, Nicholas P., Bargar, John R., Tunlid, Anders, Persson, Per, & Wallander, Hakan. Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest. United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3324-8.
Nicolas, Cesar, Almeida, Juan P., Ellstrom, Magnus, Bahr, Adam, Bone, Sharon E., Rosenstock, Nicholas P., Bargar, John R., Tunlid, Anders, Persson, Per, and Wallander, Hakan. 2017. "Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest". United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-017-3324-8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417665.
@article{osti_1417665,
title = {Chemical changes in organic matter after fungal colonization in a nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized Norway spruce forest},
author = {Nicolas, Cesar and Almeida, Juan P. and Ellstrom, Magnus and Bahr, Adam and Bone, Sharon E. and Rosenstock, Nicholas P. and Bargar, John R. and Tunlid, Anders and Persson, Per and Wallander, Hakan},
abstractNote = {Decomposition and transformation of organic matter (OM) in forest soils are conducted by the concomitant action of saprotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi. Here, we examine chemical changes in OM after fungal colonization in nitrogen fertilized and unfertilized soils from a Norway spruce forest. Sand-filled bags amended with composted maize leaves were placed in the forest soil and harvested after 17 months. Infrared and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies were used to study the chemical changes in the OM. Fungal community composition of the bags was also evaluated. The proportion of ectomycorrhizal fungi declined in the fertilized plots, but the overall fungal community composition was similar between N treatments. Decomposition of the OM was, independently of the N level or soil horizon, accompanied by an increase of C/N ratio of the mesh-bag content. Furthermore, the proportions of carboxylic compounds in the incubated OM increased in the mineral horizon, while heterocyclic-N compounds decreased, especially in unfertilized plots with higher N demand from the trees.},
doi = {10.1007/s11104-017-3324-8},
journal = {Plant and Soil},
number = 1-2,
volume = 419,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

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