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Title: Shock drive capabilities of a 30-Joule laser at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source

Abstract

In this paper, we measure the shock drive capabilities of a 30 J, nanosecond, 527 nm laser system at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector, we ascertain the maximum instantaneous ablation pressure and characterize its dependence on a drive laser spot size, spatial profile, and temporal profile. We also examine the effects of these parameters on shock spatial and temporal uniformity. Our analysis shows the drive laser capable of generating instantaneous ablation pressures exceeding 160 GPa while maintaining a 1D shock profile. We find that slope pulses provide higher instantaneous ablation pressures than plateau pulses. Our results show instantaneous ablation pressures comparable to those measured at the Omega Laser Facility in Rochester, NY under similar optical drive parameters. In conclusion, we analyze how optical laser ablation pressures are compare with known scaling relations, accounting for variable laser wavelengths.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1417593
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; lasers; interferometry; shock waves; polymers; interferometers

Citation Formats

Brown, Shaughnessy Brennan, Hashim, Akel, Gleason, Arianna, Galtier, Eric, Nam, Inhyuk, Xing, Zhou, Fry, Alan, MacKinnon, Andy, Nagler, Bob, Granados, Eduardo, and Lee, Hae Ja. Shock drive capabilities of a 30-Joule laser at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4997756.
Brown, Shaughnessy Brennan, Hashim, Akel, Gleason, Arianna, Galtier, Eric, Nam, Inhyuk, Xing, Zhou, Fry, Alan, MacKinnon, Andy, Nagler, Bob, Granados, Eduardo, & Lee, Hae Ja. Shock drive capabilities of a 30-Joule laser at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4997756.
Brown, Shaughnessy Brennan, Hashim, Akel, Gleason, Arianna, Galtier, Eric, Nam, Inhyuk, Xing, Zhou, Fry, Alan, MacKinnon, Andy, Nagler, Bob, Granados, Eduardo, and Lee, Hae Ja. 2017. "Shock drive capabilities of a 30-Joule laser at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4997756.
@article{osti_1417593,
title = {Shock drive capabilities of a 30-Joule laser at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source},
author = {Brown, Shaughnessy Brennan and Hashim, Akel and Gleason, Arianna and Galtier, Eric and Nam, Inhyuk and Xing, Zhou and Fry, Alan and MacKinnon, Andy and Nagler, Bob and Granados, Eduardo and Lee, Hae Ja},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we measure the shock drive capabilities of a 30 J, nanosecond, 527 nm laser system at the matter in extreme conditions hutch of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector, we ascertain the maximum instantaneous ablation pressure and characterize its dependence on a drive laser spot size, spatial profile, and temporal profile. We also examine the effects of these parameters on shock spatial and temporal uniformity. Our analysis shows the drive laser capable of generating instantaneous ablation pressures exceeding 160 GPa while maintaining a 1D shock profile. We find that slope pulses provide higher instantaneous ablation pressures than plateau pulses. Our results show instantaneous ablation pressures comparable to those measured at the Omega Laser Facility in Rochester, NY under similar optical drive parameters. In conclusion, we analyze how optical laser ablation pressures are compare with known scaling relations, accounting for variable laser wavelengths.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4997756},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 10,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 23, 2018
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  • Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatterx-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. Furthermore, the combination of experiments fully demonstratesmore » the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.« less
  • Recent experiments performed at the Matter in Extreme Conditions end station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have demonstrated the first spectrally resolved measurements of plasmons from isochorically heated aluminum. The experiments have been performed using a seeded 8-keV x-ray laser beam as a pump and probe to both volumetrically heat and scatter x-rays from aluminum. Collective x-ray Thomson scattering spectra show a well-resolved plasmon feature that is down-shifted in energy by 19 eV. In addition, Mbar shock pressures from laser-compressed aluminum foils using velocity interferometer system for any reflector have been measured. The combination of experiments fully demonstratesmore » the possibility to perform warm dense matter studies at the LCLS with unprecedented accuracy and precision.« less
  • The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.
  • The Matter in Extreme Conditions end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a new tool enabling accurate pump-probe measurements for studying the physical properties of matter in the high-energy density physics regime. This instrument combines the world’s brightest x-ray source, the LCLS x-ray beam, with high-power lasers consisting of two nanosecond Nd:glass laser beams and one short-pulse Ti:sapphire laser. These lasers produce short-lived states of matter with high pressures, high temperatures or high densities with properties that are important for applications in nuclear fusion research, laboratory astrophysics and the development of intense radiation sources. In the firstmore » experiments, we have performed highly accurate x-ray diffraction and x-ray Thomson scattering techniques on shock-compressed matter resolving the transition from compressed solid matter to a co-existence regime and into the warm dense matter state. Furthermore, these complex charged-particle systems are dominated by strong correlations and quantum effects. They exist in planetary interiors and laboratory experiments, e.g., during high-power laser interactions with solids or the compression phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Applying record peak brightness X rays resolves the ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and measure the static structure factor, which is a key quantity for determining equation of state data and important transport coefficients. Simultaneously, spectrally resolved measurements of plasmon features provide dynamic structure factor information that yield temperature and density with unprecedented precision at micron-scale resolution in dynamic compression experiments. This set of studies demonstrates our ability to measure fundamental thermodynamic properties that determine the state of matter in the high-energy density physics regime.« less