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Title: NREL/Industry Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Package Delivery

Abstract

Range-extended electric vehicle (EV) technology can be a viable option for reducing fuel consumption from medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) engines by approximately 50 percent or more. Such engines have wide variations in use and duty cycles, however, and identifying the vocations/duty cycles most suitable for range-extended applications is vital for maximizing the potential benefits. This presentation provides information about NREL's research on range-extended EV technologies, with a focus on NREL's real-world data collection and analysis approach to identifying the vocations/duty cycles best suited for range-extender applications and to help guide related powertrain optimization and design requirements. The presentation also details NREL's drive cycle development process as it pertains to package delivery applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1417585
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5400-70558
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the SAE 2017 Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Symposium, 14-15 November 2017, Dearborn, Michigan
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; range extender; range-extended electric vehicles; range-extended EV, Fleet DNA; FASTSim; DRIVE analysis tool; drive cycle development process

Citation Formats

Farrell, John T, Kelly, Kenneth J, Duran, Adam W, Lammert, Michael P, and Miller, Eric S. NREL/Industry Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Package Delivery. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Farrell, John T, Kelly, Kenneth J, Duran, Adam W, Lammert, Michael P, & Miller, Eric S. NREL/Industry Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Package Delivery. United States.
Farrell, John T, Kelly, Kenneth J, Duran, Adam W, Lammert, Michael P, and Miller, Eric S. 2018. "NREL/Industry Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Package Delivery". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417585.
@article{osti_1417585,
title = {NREL/Industry Range-Extended Electric Vehicle for Package Delivery},
author = {Farrell, John T and Kelly, Kenneth J and Duran, Adam W and Lammert, Michael P and Miller, Eric S},
abstractNote = {Range-extended electric vehicle (EV) technology can be a viable option for reducing fuel consumption from medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) engines by approximately 50 percent or more. Such engines have wide variations in use and duty cycles, however, and identifying the vocations/duty cycles most suitable for range-extended applications is vital for maximizing the potential benefits. This presentation provides information about NREL's research on range-extended EV technologies, with a focus on NREL's real-world data collection and analysis approach to identifying the vocations/duty cycles best suited for range-extender applications and to help guide related powertrain optimization and design requirements. The presentation also details NREL's drive cycle development process as it pertains to package delivery applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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