skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Water for electricity in India: A multi-model study of future challenges and linkages to climate change mitigation

Abstract

This paper provides projections of water withdrawals and consumption for electricity generation in India through 2050. Based on the results from five energy-economic modeling teams, the paper explores the implications of economic growth, power plant cooling policies, and electricity CO2 emissions reductions on water withdrawals and consumption. To isolate modeling differences, the five teams used harmonized assumptions regarding economic and population growth, the distribution of power plants by cooling technologies, and withdrawals and consumption intensities. The results demonstrate the different but potentially complementary implications of cooling technology policies and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions. The application of closed-loop cooling technologies substantially reduces water withdrawals but increases consumption. The water implications of CO2 emissions reductions, depend critically on the approach to these reductions. Focusing on wind and solar power reduces consumption and withdrawals; a focus on nuclear power increases both; and a focus on hydroelectric power could increase consumptive losses through evaporation.

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1417436
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-122615
Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619; 830403000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Energy; Journal Volume: 210; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
India; electricity generation; water use; water withdrawal; water consumption

Citation Formats

Srinivasan, Shweta, Kholod, Nazar, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, Ghosh, Probal Pratap, Mathur, Ritu, Clarke, Leon, Evans, Meredydd, Hejazi, Mohamad, Kanudia, Amit, Koti, Poonam Nagar, Liu, Bo, Parikh, Kirit S., Ali, Mohammed Sahil, and Sharma, Kabir. Water for electricity in India: A multi-model study of future challenges and linkages to climate change mitigation. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.04.079.
Srinivasan, Shweta, Kholod, Nazar, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, Ghosh, Probal Pratap, Mathur, Ritu, Clarke, Leon, Evans, Meredydd, Hejazi, Mohamad, Kanudia, Amit, Koti, Poonam Nagar, Liu, Bo, Parikh, Kirit S., Ali, Mohammed Sahil, & Sharma, Kabir. Water for electricity in India: A multi-model study of future challenges and linkages to climate change mitigation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.04.079.
Srinivasan, Shweta, Kholod, Nazar, Chaturvedi, Vaibhav, Ghosh, Probal Pratap, Mathur, Ritu, Clarke, Leon, Evans, Meredydd, Hejazi, Mohamad, Kanudia, Amit, Koti, Poonam Nagar, Liu, Bo, Parikh, Kirit S., Ali, Mohammed Sahil, and Sharma, Kabir. Mon . "Water for electricity in India: A multi-model study of future challenges and linkages to climate change mitigation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.04.079.
@article{osti_1417436,
title = {Water for electricity in India: A multi-model study of future challenges and linkages to climate change mitigation},
author = {Srinivasan, Shweta and Kholod, Nazar and Chaturvedi, Vaibhav and Ghosh, Probal Pratap and Mathur, Ritu and Clarke, Leon and Evans, Meredydd and Hejazi, Mohamad and Kanudia, Amit and Koti, Poonam Nagar and Liu, Bo and Parikh, Kirit S. and Ali, Mohammed Sahil and Sharma, Kabir},
abstractNote = {This paper provides projections of water withdrawals and consumption for electricity generation in India through 2050. Based on the results from five energy-economic modeling teams, the paper explores the implications of economic growth, power plant cooling policies, and electricity CO2 emissions reductions on water withdrawals and consumption. To isolate modeling differences, the five teams used harmonized assumptions regarding economic and population growth, the distribution of power plants by cooling technologies, and withdrawals and consumption intensities. The results demonstrate the different but potentially complementary implications of cooling technology policies and efforts to reduce CO2 emissions. The application of closed-loop cooling technologies substantially reduces water withdrawals but increases consumption. The water implications of CO2 emissions reductions, depend critically on the approach to these reductions. Focusing on wind and solar power reduces consumption and withdrawals; a focus on nuclear power increases both; and a focus on hydroelectric power could increase consumptive losses through evaporation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2017.04.079},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 210,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}