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Title: Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere

Abstract

Infrared integrating sphere measurements of solid samples are important in providing reference data for contact, standoff and remote sensing applications. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) we have developed protocols to measure both the directional-hemispherical ( and diffuse (d) reflectances of powders, liquids, and disks of powders and solid materials using a commercially available, matte gold-coated integrating sphere and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Detailed descriptions of the sphere alignment and its use for making these reflectance measurements are given. Diffuse reflectance values were found to be dependent on the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) of the sample and the solid angle intercepted by the sphere’s specular exclusion port. To determine how well the sphere and protocols produce quantitative reflectance data, measurements were made of three diffuse and two specular standards prepared by the National institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA), LabSphere Infragold and Spectralon standards, hand-loaded sulfur and talc powder samples, and water. The five NIST standards behaved as expected: the three diffuse standards had a high degree of “diffuseness,” d/ = D > 0.9, whereas the two specular standards had D ≤ 0.03. The average absolute differences between the NIST and PNNL measurements of the NIST standardsmore » for both directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectances are on the order of 0.01 reflectance units. Other quantitative differences between the PNNL-measured and calibration (where available) or literature reflectance values for these standards and materials are given and the possible origins of discrepancies are discussed. Random uncertainties and estimates of systematic uncertainties are presented. Corrections necessary to provide better agreement between the PNNL reflectance values as measured for the NIST standards and the NIST reflectance values for these same standards are also discussed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1417431
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-128926
Journal ID: ISSN 1559-128X; APOPAI; DN2001000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Applied Optics; Journal Volume: 57; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Blake, Thomas A., Johnson, Timothy J., Tonkyn, Russell G., Forland, Brenda M., Myers, Tanya L., Brauer, Carolyn S., Su, Yin-Fong, Bernacki, Bruce E., Hanssen, Leonard, and Gonzalez, Gerardo. Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1364/AO.57.000432.
Blake, Thomas A., Johnson, Timothy J., Tonkyn, Russell G., Forland, Brenda M., Myers, Tanya L., Brauer, Carolyn S., Su, Yin-Fong, Bernacki, Bruce E., Hanssen, Leonard, & Gonzalez, Gerardo. Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere. United States. doi:10.1364/AO.57.000432.
Blake, Thomas A., Johnson, Timothy J., Tonkyn, Russell G., Forland, Brenda M., Myers, Tanya L., Brauer, Carolyn S., Su, Yin-Fong, Bernacki, Bruce E., Hanssen, Leonard, and Gonzalez, Gerardo. Mon . "Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere". United States. doi:10.1364/AO.57.000432.
@article{osti_1417431,
title = {Methods for quantitative infrared directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectance measurements using an FTIR and a commercial integrating sphere},
author = {Blake, Thomas A. and Johnson, Timothy J. and Tonkyn, Russell G. and Forland, Brenda M. and Myers, Tanya L. and Brauer, Carolyn S. and Su, Yin-Fong and Bernacki, Bruce E. and Hanssen, Leonard and Gonzalez, Gerardo},
abstractNote = {Infrared integrating sphere measurements of solid samples are important in providing reference data for contact, standoff and remote sensing applications. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) we have developed protocols to measure both the directional-hemispherical ( and diffuse (d) reflectances of powders, liquids, and disks of powders and solid materials using a commercially available, matte gold-coated integrating sphere and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Detailed descriptions of the sphere alignment and its use for making these reflectance measurements are given. Diffuse reflectance values were found to be dependent on the bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) of the sample and the solid angle intercepted by the sphere’s specular exclusion port. To determine how well the sphere and protocols produce quantitative reflectance data, measurements were made of three diffuse and two specular standards prepared by the National institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA), LabSphere Infragold and Spectralon standards, hand-loaded sulfur and talc powder samples, and water. The five NIST standards behaved as expected: the three diffuse standards had a high degree of “diffuseness,” d/ = D > 0.9, whereas the two specular standards had D ≤ 0.03. The average absolute differences between the NIST and PNNL measurements of the NIST standards for both directional-hemispherical and diffuse reflectances are on the order of 0.01 reflectance units. Other quantitative differences between the PNNL-measured and calibration (where available) or literature reflectance values for these standards and materials are given and the possible origins of discrepancies are discussed. Random uncertainties and estimates of systematic uncertainties are presented. Corrections necessary to provide better agreement between the PNNL reflectance values as measured for the NIST standards and the NIST reflectance values for these same standards are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1364/AO.57.000432},
journal = {Applied Optics},
number = 3,
volume = 57,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2018},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2018}
}