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Title: Pressure Induced Densification and Compression in a Reprocessed Borosilicate Glass

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. ARMY RESEARCH
OSTI Identifier:
1417398
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Materials; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Ham, Kathryn, Kono, Yoshio, Patel, Parimal, Kilczewski, Steven, and Vohra, Yogesh. Pressure Induced Densification and Compression in a Reprocessed Borosilicate Glass. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3390/ma11010114.
Ham, Kathryn, Kono, Yoshio, Patel, Parimal, Kilczewski, Steven, & Vohra, Yogesh. Pressure Induced Densification and Compression in a Reprocessed Borosilicate Glass. United States. doi:10.3390/ma11010114.
Ham, Kathryn, Kono, Yoshio, Patel, Parimal, Kilczewski, Steven, and Vohra, Yogesh. 2018. "Pressure Induced Densification and Compression in a Reprocessed Borosilicate Glass". United States. doi:10.3390/ma11010114.
@article{osti_1417398,
title = {Pressure Induced Densification and Compression in a Reprocessed Borosilicate Glass},
author = {Ham, Kathryn and Kono, Yoshio and Patel, Parimal and Kilczewski, Steven and Vohra, Yogesh},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.3390/ma11010114},
journal = {Materials},
number = 1,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}
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