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Title: Realizing the Potential of Micro-Phase Separated Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Ion Domain Connectivity Plays a Prominent Role in Ion Conduction

Abstract

Block copolymer electrolytes (BCEs) offer the prospect of membranes with high ionic conductivity at lower ion-exchange capacities leading to membranes with robust mechanical properties. However, the microphase separated structure of such BCE membranes and its impact on membrane conductivity is poorly understood. Most studies assume that aggregated ionic domains in microphase separated BCEs, or random copolymers, is sufficient to foster facile ion conductivity. However, microphase separation alone cannot spur rapid ion conduction. In this paper, we demonstrate that ion domain connectivity greatly influences ion conductivity in BCEs. The results emphasize the importance of maximizing ion domain connectivity while minimizing terminal defects to realize BCEs with optimal ion transport properties.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science - Office of Basic Energy Sciences - Materials Sciences and Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1417357
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ECS Transactions (Online); Journal Volume: 75; Journal Issue: 14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Arges, C. G., Kambe, Y., Dolejsi, M., Wu, G., Segal-Peretz, T., Ren, J., and Nealey, P. F. Realizing the Potential of Micro-Phase Separated Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Ion Domain Connectivity Plays a Prominent Role in Ion Conduction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1149/07514.1013ecst.
Arges, C. G., Kambe, Y., Dolejsi, M., Wu, G., Segal-Peretz, T., Ren, J., & Nealey, P. F. Realizing the Potential of Micro-Phase Separated Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Ion Domain Connectivity Plays a Prominent Role in Ion Conduction. United States. doi:10.1149/07514.1013ecst.
Arges, C. G., Kambe, Y., Dolejsi, M., Wu, G., Segal-Peretz, T., Ren, J., and Nealey, P. F. 2016. "Realizing the Potential of Micro-Phase Separated Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Ion Domain Connectivity Plays a Prominent Role in Ion Conduction". United States. doi:10.1149/07514.1013ecst.
@article{osti_1417357,
title = {Realizing the Potential of Micro-Phase Separated Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Ion Domain Connectivity Plays a Prominent Role in Ion Conduction},
author = {Arges, C. G. and Kambe, Y. and Dolejsi, M. and Wu, G. and Segal-Peretz, T. and Ren, J. and Nealey, P. F.},
abstractNote = {Block copolymer electrolytes (BCEs) offer the prospect of membranes with high ionic conductivity at lower ion-exchange capacities leading to membranes with robust mechanical properties. However, the microphase separated structure of such BCE membranes and its impact on membrane conductivity is poorly understood. Most studies assume that aggregated ionic domains in microphase separated BCEs, or random copolymers, is sufficient to foster facile ion conductivity. However, microphase separation alone cannot spur rapid ion conduction. In this paper, we demonstrate that ion domain connectivity greatly influences ion conductivity in BCEs. The results emphasize the importance of maximizing ion domain connectivity while minimizing terminal defects to realize BCEs with optimal ion transport properties.},
doi = {10.1149/07514.1013ecst},
journal = {ECS Transactions (Online)},
number = 14,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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