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Title: An Analysis of Techno-Economic Requirements for MOSAIC CPV Systems to Achieve Cost Competitiveness

Abstract

A comprehensive bottom-up cost model has been developed by NREL for ARPAE's MOSAIC micro-concentrator PV program. It will calculate LCOE for MOSAIC technologies and assess their cost competitiveness compared to traditional flat-plate systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1417136
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-6A20-70789
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at Optics for Solar Energy 2017, 6-9 November 2017, Boulder, Colorado
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; concentrating solar power; photovoltaics; micro-optics

Citation Formats

Horowitz, Kelsey A, Cunningham, David W., and Zahler, James. An Analysis of Techno-Economic Requirements for MOSAIC CPV Systems to Achieve Cost Competitiveness. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1364/OSE.2017.RM3C.4.
Horowitz, Kelsey A, Cunningham, David W., & Zahler, James. An Analysis of Techno-Economic Requirements for MOSAIC CPV Systems to Achieve Cost Competitiveness. United States. doi:10.1364/OSE.2017.RM3C.4.
Horowitz, Kelsey A, Cunningham, David W., and Zahler, James. 2017. "An Analysis of Techno-Economic Requirements for MOSAIC CPV Systems to Achieve Cost Competitiveness". United States. doi:10.1364/OSE.2017.RM3C.4.
@article{osti_1417136,
title = {An Analysis of Techno-Economic Requirements for MOSAIC CPV Systems to Achieve Cost Competitiveness},
author = {Horowitz, Kelsey A and Cunningham, David W. and Zahler, James},
abstractNote = {A comprehensive bottom-up cost model has been developed by NREL for ARPAE's MOSAIC micro-concentrator PV program. It will calculate LCOE for MOSAIC technologies and assess their cost competitiveness compared to traditional flat-plate systems.},
doi = {10.1364/OSE.2017.RM3C.4},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • A comprehensive bottom-up cost model has been developed by NREL for ARPAE's MOSAIC micro-concentrator PV program. In this presentation, we use this model to examine the potential competitiveness of MOSAIC systems compared to incumbent technologies in different markets. We also provide an example of how these models can be used by awardees to assess different aspects of their design.
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