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Title: Effects of long-term climate change on global building energy expenditures

Abstract

Our paper explores potential future implications of climate change on building energy expenditures around the globe. Increasing expenditures result from increased electricity use for cooling, and are offset to varying degrees, depending on the region, by decreased energy consumption for heating. WE conducted an analysis using a model of the global buildings sector within the GCAM integrated assessment model. The integrated assessment framework is valuable because it represents socioeconomic and energy system changes that will be important for understanding building energy expenditures in the future. Results indicate that changes in net expenditures are not uniform across the globe. Net expenditures decrease in some regions, such as Canada and Russia, where heating demands currently dominate, and increase the most in areas with less demand for space heating and greater demand for space cooling. We explain these results in terms of the basic drivers that link building energy expenditures to regional climate.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joint Global Change Research Inst., College Park, MD (United States)
  2. U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis
  3. ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Irving, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1416965
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy Economics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Energy Economics; Journal ID: ISSN 0140-9883
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate change impacts; integrated assessment; buildings energy demand

Citation Formats

Clarke, Leon, Eom, Jiyong, Marten, Elke Hodson, Horowitz, Russell, Kyle, Page, Link, Robert, Mignone, Bryan K., Mundra, Anupriya, and Zhou, Yuyu. Effects of long-term climate change on global building energy expenditures. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/J.ENECO.2018.01.003.
Clarke, Leon, Eom, Jiyong, Marten, Elke Hodson, Horowitz, Russell, Kyle, Page, Link, Robert, Mignone, Bryan K., Mundra, Anupriya, & Zhou, Yuyu. Effects of long-term climate change on global building energy expenditures. United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENECO.2018.01.003.
Clarke, Leon, Eom, Jiyong, Marten, Elke Hodson, Horowitz, Russell, Kyle, Page, Link, Robert, Mignone, Bryan K., Mundra, Anupriya, and Zhou, Yuyu. 2018. "Effects of long-term climate change on global building energy expenditures". United States. doi:10.1016/J.ENECO.2018.01.003.
@article{osti_1416965,
title = {Effects of long-term climate change on global building energy expenditures},
author = {Clarke, Leon and Eom, Jiyong and Marten, Elke Hodson and Horowitz, Russell and Kyle, Page and Link, Robert and Mignone, Bryan K. and Mundra, Anupriya and Zhou, Yuyu},
abstractNote = {Our paper explores potential future implications of climate change on building energy expenditures around the globe. Increasing expenditures result from increased electricity use for cooling, and are offset to varying degrees, depending on the region, by decreased energy consumption for heating. WE conducted an analysis using a model of the global buildings sector within the GCAM integrated assessment model. The integrated assessment framework is valuable because it represents socioeconomic and energy system changes that will be important for understanding building energy expenditures in the future. Results indicate that changes in net expenditures are not uniform across the globe. Net expenditures decrease in some regions, such as Canada and Russia, where heating demands currently dominate, and increase the most in areas with less demand for space heating and greater demand for space cooling. We explain these results in terms of the basic drivers that link building energy expenditures to regional climate.},
doi = {10.1016/J.ENECO.2018.01.003},
journal = {Energy Economics},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2018,
month = 1
}

Journal Article:
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