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Title: Ligand-Sensitized Lanthanide Nanocrystals: Merging Solid-State Photophysics and Molecular Solution Chemistry

Abstract

To date, the breadth of scientific research that has been devoted to investigating the photochemical and photophysical behavior of the lanthanide elements has generally fallen into one of two camps: solution studies of luminescent lanthanide metal-ligand complexes or investigations of solid-state nanoparticles, composed primarily of, or doped with, lanthan ide lumiphores. In the latter case, most research of lanthanide nanocolloids has precluded any investigations regarding the use of organic ligands to overcome the difficulties associated with f-f excitation of lanthanides. Instead, most work on condensed-phase lanthanide luminescence has centered on strategies such as d-f charge separation in divalent lanthanides and the sensitization of lanthanide excited states using quantum dots. Current work now aims at bridging the camps of condensed-phase lanthanide photophysics and the solution chemistry of ligand-lanthanide molecular complexes. Some recent efforts have partly focused on the fundamental characterization of NaGd 1-x Ln x F 4 nanoparticles featuring surface display of the sensitizer ligand 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), showing these structures to be capable of converting absorbed UV light into luminescence from Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ ions. Our results suggest such a use of the ligand sensitization as a tool of choice to overcome the constraints of UV solar spectrum/semiconductor band-gap mismatchmore » and low absorption cross sections in solid-state lanthanide systems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1416912
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Inorganic Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 55; Journal Issue: 20; Journal ID: ISSN 0020-1669
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Agbo, Peter, and Abergel, Rebecca J. Ligand-Sensitized Lanthanide Nanocrystals: Merging Solid-State Photophysics and Molecular Solution Chemistry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00879.
Agbo, Peter, & Abergel, Rebecca J. Ligand-Sensitized Lanthanide Nanocrystals: Merging Solid-State Photophysics and Molecular Solution Chemistry. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00879.
Agbo, Peter, and Abergel, Rebecca J. 2016. "Ligand-Sensitized Lanthanide Nanocrystals: Merging Solid-State Photophysics and Molecular Solution Chemistry". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00879. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416912.
@article{osti_1416912,
title = {Ligand-Sensitized Lanthanide Nanocrystals: Merging Solid-State Photophysics and Molecular Solution Chemistry},
author = {Agbo, Peter and Abergel, Rebecca J.},
abstractNote = {To date, the breadth of scientific research that has been devoted to investigating the photochemical and photophysical behavior of the lanthanide elements has generally fallen into one of two camps: solution studies of luminescent lanthanide metal-ligand complexes or investigations of solid-state nanoparticles, composed primarily of, or doped with, lanthan ide lumiphores. In the latter case, most research of lanthanide nanocolloids has precluded any investigations regarding the use of organic ligands to overcome the difficulties associated with f-f excitation of lanthanides. Instead, most work on condensed-phase lanthanide luminescence has centered on strategies such as d-f charge separation in divalent lanthanides and the sensitization of lanthanide excited states using quantum dots. Current work now aims at bridging the camps of condensed-phase lanthanide photophysics and the solution chemistry of ligand-lanthanide molecular complexes. Some recent efforts have partly focused on the fundamental characterization of NaGd 1-x Ln x F 4 nanoparticles featuring surface display of the sensitizer ligand 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), showing these structures to be capable of converting absorbed UV light into luminescence from Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ ions. Our results suggest such a use of the ligand sensitization as a tool of choice to overcome the constraints of UV solar spectrum/semiconductor band-gap mismatch and low absorption cross sections in solid-state lanthanide systems.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.inorgchem.6b00879},
journal = {Inorganic Chemistry},
number = 20,
volume = 55,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
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  • Optical upconversion via sensitized triplet–triplet exciton annihilation converts incoherent low-energy photons to shorter wavelengths under modest excitation intensities1, 2, 3. Here, we report a solid-state thin film for infrared-to-visible upconversion that employs lead sulphide colloidal nanocrystals as a sensitizer. Upconversion is achieved from pump wavelengths beyond λ = 1 μm to emission at λ = 612 nm. When excited at λ = 808 nm, two excitons in the sensitizer are converted to one higher-energy state in the emitter at a yield of 1.2 ± 0.2%. Peak efficiency is attained at an absorbed intensity equivalent to less than one sun. Wemore » demonstrate that colloidal nanocrystals are an attractive alternative to existing molecular sensitizers, given their small exchange splitting, wide wavelength tunability, broadband infrared absorption, and our transient observations of efficient energy transfer. This solid-state architecture for upconversion may prove useful for enhancing the capabilities of solar cells and photodetectors.« less
  • Optical upconversion via sensitized triplet–triplet exciton annihilation converts incoherent low-energy photons to shorter wavelengths under modest excitation intensities1,2,3. Here, we report a solid-state thin film for infrared-to-visible upconversion that employs lead sulphide colloidal nanocrystals as a sensitizer. Upconversion is achieved from pump wavelengths beyond λ = 1 μm to emission at λ = 612 nm. When excited at λ = 808 nm, two excitons in the sensitizer are converted to one higher-energy state in the emitter at a yield of 1.2 ± 0.2%. Peak efficiency is attained at an absorbed intensity equivalent to less than one sun. We demonstrate thatmore » colloidal nanocrystals are an attractive alternative to existing molecular sensitizers, given their small exchange splitting, wide wavelength tunability, broadband infrared absorption, and our transient observations of efficient energy transfer. This solid-state architecture for upconversion may prove useful for enhancing the capabilities of solar cells and photodetectors.« less
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