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Title: Engineering solar cells based on correlative X-ray microscopy

Abstract

In situ and operando measurement techniques combined with nanoscale resolution have proven invaluable in multiple fields of study. We argue that evaluating device performance as well as material behavior by correlative X-ray microscopy with <100 nm resolution can radically change the approach for optimizing absorbers, interfaces and full devices in solar cell research. Here, we thoroughly discuss the measurement technique of X-ray beam induced current and point out fundamental differences between measurements of wafer-based silicon and thin-film solar cells. Based on reports of the last years, we showcase the potential that X-ray microscopy measurements have in combination with in situ and operando approaches throughout the solar cell lifecycle: from the growth of individual layers to the performance under operating conditions and degradation mechanisms. Enabled by new developments in synchrotron beamlines, the combination of high spatial resolution with high brilliance and a safe working distance allows for the insertion of measurement equipment that can pave the way for a new class of experiments. When applied to photovoltaics research, we highlight today’s opportunities and challenges in the field of nanoscale X-ray microscopy, and give an outlook on future developments.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Electrical Computer and Energy Engineering
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1416734
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; EE0005848; EEC-1041895
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0884-2914
Publisher:
Materials Research Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; X-ray fluorescence; nanoscale; photovoltaic; operando; in-situ; solar cells; X-ray microscopy; correlative microscopy; HXM

Citation Formats

Stuckelberger, Michael, West, Bradley, Nietzold, Tara, Lai, Barry, Maser, Jörg M., Rose, Volker, and Bertoni, Mariana I.. Engineering solar cells based on correlative X-ray microscopy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1557/jmr.2017.108.
Stuckelberger, Michael, West, Bradley, Nietzold, Tara, Lai, Barry, Maser, Jörg M., Rose, Volker, & Bertoni, Mariana I.. Engineering solar cells based on correlative X-ray microscopy. United States. doi:10.1557/jmr.2017.108.
Stuckelberger, Michael, West, Bradley, Nietzold, Tara, Lai, Barry, Maser, Jörg M., Rose, Volker, and Bertoni, Mariana I.. Mon . "Engineering solar cells based on correlative X-ray microscopy". United States. doi:10.1557/jmr.2017.108. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416734.
@article{osti_1416734,
title = {Engineering solar cells based on correlative X-ray microscopy},
author = {Stuckelberger, Michael and West, Bradley and Nietzold, Tara and Lai, Barry and Maser, Jörg M. and Rose, Volker and Bertoni, Mariana I.},
abstractNote = {In situ and operando measurement techniques combined with nanoscale resolution have proven invaluable in multiple fields of study. We argue that evaluating device performance as well as material behavior by correlative X-ray microscopy with <100 nm resolution can radically change the approach for optimizing absorbers, interfaces and full devices in solar cell research. Here, we thoroughly discuss the measurement technique of X-ray beam induced current and point out fundamental differences between measurements of wafer-based silicon and thin-film solar cells. Based on reports of the last years, we showcase the potential that X-ray microscopy measurements have in combination with in situ and operando approaches throughout the solar cell lifecycle: from the growth of individual layers to the performance under operating conditions and degradation mechanisms. Enabled by new developments in synchrotron beamlines, the combination of high spatial resolution with high brilliance and a safe working distance allows for the insertion of measurement equipment that can pave the way for a new class of experiments. When applied to photovoltaics research, we highlight today’s opportunities and challenges in the field of nanoscale X-ray microscopy, and give an outlook on future developments.},
doi = {10.1557/jmr.2017.108},
journal = {Journal of Materials Research},
number = 10,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 4works
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